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NEWS
By Robert Lang | December 10, 2009
Just as surely as Christmas is coming, so, too, is the day of reckoning for Flintridge’s lack of a comprehensive solution to its wastewater problem. The only real question for those of us who live south of Foothill is whether we decide to take the initiative and forge a reasonable compromise with both the city of La Cañada Flintridge and L.A. County, or simply sit back and let others force an unfairly expensive and environmentally unnecessary sewer system down our protesting throats.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | November 29, 2007
As of Monday, 1,065 sewer system surveys had been received at La Cañada Flintridge City Hall. That?s only just more than 50 percent of the 1,949 surveys sent out to sewer district No. 5 residents, but up 363 from those turned in prior to the original Nov. 5 deadline. The City Council agreed to extend the deadline indefinitely in the hope that a larger percentage of residents will return the surveys and let the city know which direction the residents choose to go with their wastewater discharge.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
Let me please state, right up front, that I am one that believes and wants my district (district 5) to have sewers. However, I will not vote for a $50,000 sewer assessment nor do I believe the whole of District 5 will receive it with open arms. With that stated, I'd like to share some of my observations about what has transpired with the city about sewers. If anyone remembers the March 5 council meeting, there was an outrage from the public during the comment session about the sewer assessment.
NEWS
March 5, 2014
A foreboding specter is haunting owners of residences in the Flintridge area and other communities that do not have public sewers available. The Los Angeles County Environmental Health Department regulates new private sewage-disposal systems, also known as on-site wastewater treatment systems, and their regulations have over the years become increasingly complicated and difficult to comply with. Their most recent version of the guidelines is 38 pages long. Due to the intransigence of the bureaucrats who review feasibility studies, the review process alone can take up to two years and several tens of thousands of dollars, after which approvals are not guaranteed.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | November 12, 2009
The Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board last week banned the installation of septic systems in central and eastern Malibu due to concerns about seepage and contamination. Malibu and La Cañada Flintridge have long been the only cities in the county of Los Angeles where septic tanks remain legal and widely used. The decision came at a meeting on Nov. 5 that lasted 10 hours and drew hundreds of people on both sides of the issue to Metropolitan Water District of Southern California headquarters in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
Sid Karsh's letter offers an opportunity to speak to several issues that are not well understood, at least by Mr. Karsh. California currently has over 1.2 million septic systems in place and more waiting permits. While many in the regulatory community would like all to be replaced with sewer that is not going to take place any time soon. Regulations for AB 885, the state law governing on site wastewater systems, are being finalized. Those regulations will monitor septic systems, not eliminate them.
NEWS
June 11, 2009
CVWD workshop open to residents The Board of Directors of the Crescenta Valley Water District, which serves households living in a portion of the west side of La Cañada Flintridge, will be holding a public workshop to discuss the proposed 2009-10 budgets for water and wastewater operations at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 16, at the district office, 2700 Foothill Blvd., La Crescenta. The public is invited to attend and provide comments. For more information go online to www.cvwd.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
by Jacqueline Chen An agreement between the La Cañada Flintridge City Public Works Department and the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, signed in December of 2004, has held the various regulatory bodies at bay while the city finds ways for residents to take care of problems with their septic systems. Under terms of the agreement, the city's Public Works Department takes charge of ensuring the city's waste water is properly disposed of. As signed, the memorandum is valid for five years, but time may be running out for homeowners with malfunctioning or failed systems.
NEWS
January 18, 2007
The Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County are beginning a public outreach effort in support of a new master facilities plan, "Clearwater Program," for the joint outfall system network serving 73 of Los Angeles County's 88 cities, including La Cañada Flintridge. The local water reclamation plant is located on the grounds of the La Cañada Flintridge Country Club. The joint outfall system includes six water reclamation plants and the joint water pollution control plant that is located in the city of Carson, interconnected by more than 1,200 miles of main trunk sewers with 50 pumping plants serving local sewer systems.
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NEWS
March 5, 2014
A foreboding specter is haunting owners of residences in the Flintridge area and other communities that do not have public sewers available. The Los Angeles County Environmental Health Department regulates new private sewage-disposal systems, also known as on-site wastewater treatment systems, and their regulations have over the years become increasingly complicated and difficult to comply with. Their most recent version of the guidelines is 38 pages long. Due to the intransigence of the bureaucrats who review feasibility studies, the review process alone can take up to two years and several tens of thousands of dollars, after which approvals are not guaranteed.
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NEWS
By Robert Lang | December 13, 2009
Just as surely as Christmas is coming, so, too, is the day of reckoning for Flintridge?s lack of a comprehensive solution to its wastewater problem. The only real question for those of us who live south of Foothill is whether we decide to take the initiative and forge a reasonable compromise with both the city of La Cañada Flintridge and L.A. County, or simply sit back and let others force an unfairly expensive and environmentally unnecessary sewer system down our protesting throats.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | November 29, 2007
As of Monday, 1,065 sewer system surveys had been received at La Cañada Flintridge City Hall. That?s only just more than 50 percent of the 1,949 surveys sent out to sewer district No. 5 residents, but up 363 from those turned in prior to the original Nov. 5 deadline. The City Council agreed to extend the deadline indefinitely in the hope that a larger percentage of residents will return the surveys and let the city know which direction the residents choose to go with their wastewater discharge.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
Let me please state, right up front, that I am one that believes and wants my district (district 5) to have sewers. However, I will not vote for a $50,000 sewer assessment nor do I believe the whole of District 5 will receive it with open arms. With that stated, I'd like to share some of my observations about what has transpired with the city about sewers. If anyone remembers the March 5 council meeting, there was an outrage from the public during the comment session about the sewer assessment.
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