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By Ruth Longoria | July 9, 2009
You’ve probably heard it a million times: “The big one is coming.” Residents in the Foothills also have a healthy fear of the potential of fire danger. So, it seems pretty reasonable to think that when free training became available to prepare oneself for the possibility of a disaster, there’d be a rush of residents to sign up for the classes. That’s exactly what happened when the Crescenta Valley Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) offered its upcoming training classes to prepare La Cañada and Crescenta Valley residents for a potential emergency.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 6, 2006
Many residents of La Cañada and La Crescenta remember that January 17, 1994 early morning shaker that threw us out of bed and into the reality that this truly is earthquake country. It is the memory of that Northridge Earthquake and other natural disasters, as well as emergencies including terrorist attacks, that will have community members gathering at the Crescenta Valley Sheriff's Station on July 8 to prepare for whatever is coming our way next through organizing Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010
Guild pledges $175,000 to hospital facility The Flintridge La Cañada Guild of Huntington Memorial Hospital kicked off its 2010-11 fundraising season by pledging $175,000 for the hospital's emergency and trauma center. Funds are designated to expansion of the center and construction of a new emergency multi-media conference room. This conference room is intended to serve as a command center for disaster/triage coordination with multiple agencies, as well as for operational and training needs.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | October 22, 2009
La Cañada Unified School District students joined millions of Californians across the state Oct. 15 in participating in the second annual Great California ShakeOut drill. The drill is designed to ensure that the state’s thousands of public schools and government offices will be prepared to respond in the event of an earthquake, or other similar large scale disaster. At approximately 10 a.m. La Cañada public school students were directed to “stop, cover and hold” in simulation of what action they would take during an earthquake.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 20, 2008
Now that the shaking is done, the real work analyzing what worked and what needs improvement is underway after the Great Southern California ShakeOut earthquake drill held last Thursday. “It was fantastic,” said Dr. Lucy Jones, chief scientist for the Multi Hazards Demonstration Project for Southern California U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and a fellow La Cañadan. The ShakeOut’s goal was to increase awareness and, according to Jones, that is exactly what was accomplished.
NEWS
By Fereva | November 2, 2006
My aunt and uncle own a home in Tucson, Ariz., decorated with antiques, mementos of their international travels, and most of the newest technogadgets. This includes a nifty, widescreen plasma monitor, plus a "Direct TV" package. Not so direct, that DTV, as it refused to communicate with the VHS below. My uncle and I sank to carpet level and fiddled with various wires. Satisfied, I stood and my arthritis ridden uncle tried to. "Um, I'm not exactly sure how I got down here or how I'm going to get up," my uncle, aged 90, pondered as he grasped the edge of a sturdy coffee table.
NEWS
By Ralph Saenz | May 26, 2005
For most Americans, Memorial Day is a festive time filled with parades, barbecues, baseball games and family gatherings. But, for those who have served in combat, it is a time of reflection, recollection and sometimes distress. La Cañada Flintridge, like many cities, honors its war dead with monuments, plaques and ceremonies. For the veteran who has come back from war, Memorial Day has a particular meaning. He or she can not only look back on the horror, the excitement and the absurdity of war, but can also sympathize with the men and woman who are now fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan and their families who are anxiously waiting for them at home.
NEWS
August 23, 2007
Joann Marie Naumann Baker of La Crescenta passed away Aug. 1 at the age of 78. Born in Miskawaka, Ind. on March 17, 1929, she moved with her family to Glendale in 1940. Graduating from Hoover High School, she continued her education, graduating from Woodbury College (now University) in Burbank in 1949 with a bachelor of science degree; Occidental College in 1955 with a bachelor of arts in English; and Syracuse University, N.Y. in 1957 with a master of arts in education. While continuing doctorate studies at Columbia University, she served as the assistant dean of students at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Va. Her leadership in the field of education was recognized by Who’s Who in American Education (1961-1968)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | July 9, 2009
You’ve probably heard it a million times: “The big one is coming.” Residents in the Foothills also have a healthy fear of the potential of fire danger. So, it seems pretty reasonable to think that when free training became available to prepare oneself for the possibility of a disaster, there’d be a rush of residents to sign up for the classes. That’s exactly what happened when the Crescenta Valley Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) offered its upcoming training classes to prepare La Cañada and Crescenta Valley residents for a potential emergency.
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