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By Nancy Turney | November 12, 2009
Q. I am concerned about my husband’s memory. The doctor asked him who the president is, he gave the correct answer and the doctor said he is fine. What should I do? I am concerned about my husband’s memory. The doctor asked him who the president is, he gave the correct answer and the doctor said he is fine. What should I do? — Jane, La Crescenta   You are wise to be concerned. We hear so much about Alzheimer’s disease in the press lately, yet it is generally not diagnosed until five to eight years after the first signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Loa Blasucci | November 19, 2009
They say gratitude is good for the soul. But I?m going to have to go one step further and add ? not only is it good for the soul, it?s great for the body. Stress and gratitude are polar opposites. They?re at two opposite ends of the spectrum. It is impossible to feel both emotions at the same time. The more gratitude we feel, the less stress we will feel. Science has shown us that stress expedites the aging process. It increases inflammation, can add strain to the heart, causes muscle tension, headaches, insomnia, digestive disorders, disrupts normal thyroid and hormone function, and this is only a fraction of the list ?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2010
Q. What are steps I can take to prevent or treat osteoporosis? A. There are things you should do at any age to prevent weakened bones. Eating foods that are rich in calcium and vitamin D is important. So is including regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. These are the best ways to keep your bones strong and healthy. Getting enough calcium all through your life helps to build and keep strong bones. People over age 50 need 1200 mg of calcium every day. Foods that are high in calcium are the best source.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | March 6, 2008
A third well at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on-site groundwater treatment system has been completed, part of an ongoing groundwater clean-up project. Since 2005, the on-site groundwater treatment system has been removing perchlorate ? which has been traced to thyroid gland disorders ? and volatile organic compounds from groundwater that was contaminated over 50 years ago through fuel used in rockets during the time JPL was working with the U.S. military. JPL stopped the military work in the late 1950s but the damage to the groundwater had already been done.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | November 24, 2005
NASA will begin drafting plans soon for a $1 million water cleanup project adjacent to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the project director said Friday. Steve Slaten said the agency will issue an official record of decision (ROD) on the project in about six months, with the work to begin after that. About 20 people attended a meeting last week in Altadena to discuss the new cleanup effort. Slaten said no new issues were raised at the Nov. 16 meeting. The space agency is planning to spend about $1 million to drill two additional wells to deal with perchlorate in groundwater near the lab in La Cañada.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | November 3, 2005
NASA's ongoing effort to clean up contaminated water under the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada will be ramped up, under a plan just released. The plan, available on-line and at local libraries, will be discussed at a community meeting Nov. 16 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Altadena Community Center, 730 E. Altadena. The website is jplwater.nasa.gov. The cleanup effort has been underway for a number of years, and reflects problems caused during early days at the lab, from about 1945-60.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | November 11, 2010
Q. I am concerned about my husband's memory. The doctor asked him who the president is, he gave the correct answer and the doctor said he is fine. What should I do? You are wise to be concerned. We hear so much about Alzheimer's disease in the press lately, yet it is generally not diagnosed until 5-8 years after the first signs. Medication does not cure it, but will slow the progression and the sooner it is started the better. In acknowledgement of National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month, the YMCA will be offering free, confidential memory screenings to the public on Tuesday, Nov. 16, National Memory Screening Day. We will be holding the screenings at Crescenta-Cañada YMCA from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and at Verdugo Hills YMCA from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. that same day. National Memory Screening Day (NMSD)
NEWS
By Loa Blasucci | June 8, 2011
We’re a nation of consumers. I am fascinated by the number of products that appeal to our senses because of their names. Names like “energy bar” or “sports drink.” The names alone suggest we may need them if we want to participate in sports or have energy. But a closer look leaves me in awe of the power of marketing. With around 250 calories, 9 grams of fat and nearly 20 grams of sugar, some energy bars are surprisingly similar to a Snickers bar. But something about eating a candy bar in the afternoon is going to give me a whole lot more guilt than eating something called an energy bar. We buy sports drinks thinking we need electrolytes, and for a high performance athlete, who has practiced vigorously for an hour or more, replacing fluids with electrolytes is a good idea.
NEWS
By Carol Cormaci | November 18, 2010
Until Monday the worst thing facing me this week was a root canal. And then my sister Tris, my personal idol, died. There is nothing I can write that would do justice to her, but she is at the top of my mind and I can't seem to wrestle with any other subject today. It feels self-indulgent, but I hope you'll understand. It was cancer that did Tris in. As best I can understand it, the disease started in her thyroid and made its silent march, invading the rest of her body before her doctors realized what was going on. Last spring, as soon as she was diagnosed with a cancerous tumor, my sister and her husband Frank traveled from their home in Clovis to UCLA, where she met with a highly-regarded surgeon who was upbeat about her prognosis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Loa Blasucci | November 19, 2009
They say gratitude is good for the soul. But I?m going to have to go one step further and add ? not only is it good for the soul, it?s great for the body. Stress and gratitude are polar opposites. They?re at two opposite ends of the spectrum. It is impossible to feel both emotions at the same time. The more gratitude we feel, the less stress we will feel. Science has shown us that stress expedites the aging process. It increases inflammation, can add strain to the heart, causes muscle tension, headaches, insomnia, digestive disorders, disrupts normal thyroid and hormone function, and this is only a fraction of the list ?
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By Nancy Turney | November 12, 2009
Q. I am concerned about my husband’s memory. The doctor asked him who the president is, he gave the correct answer and the doctor said he is fine. What should I do? I am concerned about my husband’s memory. The doctor asked him who the president is, he gave the correct answer and the doctor said he is fine. What should I do? — Jane, La Crescenta   You are wise to be concerned. We hear so much about Alzheimer’s disease in the press lately, yet it is generally not diagnosed until five to eight years after the first signs.
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