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By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 2, 2009
Engineers at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Tuesday filled a ramp full of powdery earth and slowly rolled a test rover onto the geological cocktail as they tried to simulate the rover Spirit’s unfortunate circumstance on Mars. Since May 6, the golf cart-sized Spirit has been embedded in an area on the west side of what scientists have named “Home Plate” on Mars. The rover’s wheels can still rotate but slip in the soft soil, so engineers won’t move it until they work out an extraction plan on Earth.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 26, 2008
On June 15, the Phoenix Mars Lander, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here, used its robotic arm to dig down into a trench called ?Dodo-Goldilocks.? As the arm scooped out soil samples it came upon dice-size clumps of bright, white material. The arm dropped the clumps to the side and scientists watched. Four days later the clumps had disappeared. ?They had been clearing out the trench area and found these few large clods. They looked light and [scientists thought] they could be ice or salt,?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 5, 2008
Since its Martian Memorial Day weekend touchdown, the Phoenix lander has been sending back pictures and data that have kept scientists and engineers busy. Although there have been some small glitches along the way, the bottom line is the Phoenix is fine and the team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is very happy, according to Mark Lemmon, camera team lead. The Phoenix website has been updated daily on the progress of the lander, with detailed photos that allow scientists and the world to see the arctic area they are investigating.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 19, 2008
After 17 years, four times its expected mission lifetime, the Ulysses spacecraft is only a few weeks away from ending its exploration of the sun. According to Ed Smith, Ulysses project scientist at JPL, the main objective of the spacecraft was to study “from every angle, the heliosphere, which is the vast bubble in space carved out by the solar wind.” He credits Ulysses with redefining the knowledge of the heliosphere and “our solar neighborhood.” The spacecraft has flown over the sun’s poles three times.
NEWS
By Bianca P. Gallegos | October 19, 2006
Beautiful gold and blue flowers that decorate Mountain Avenue Elementary school grounds are due to the diligent digging and plowing of the soil by volunteers. Last Saturday more than 30 families took part in the 11th semi-annual Beautification Day that was held at the school. The Beautification Day is held in October and April as part of a strategic plan that looks at all aspects of the school's mission which includes creating a beautiful and ecologically friendly atmosphere. The school set Beautification Day goals that included adding soil amendments to planting areas, replacing the stepping stones in the second grade area, setting bricks in sand in front of the first grade rooms at the stairwell area and putting rocks along steps between the kindergarten playground and primary yard.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | September 9, 2010
It started with a book recommendation. La Cañada Flintridge resident Janet McNiff, 69, was at a spring check-up when her doctor suggested some dietary changes, and referred her to "Living Beyond Organic," by Christina Avaness. She and her husband Frank McNiff, 70, pored through its pages, experimenting with how to implement the many nutritional recommendations. And soon they were scouting their yard, at the corner of Vineta Avenue and Houseman Street, for an appropriate spot for a vegetable patch.
FEATURES
By Max Zimbert | May 13, 2010
Thirteen-year-old Chad Anderson had no problem waking up early Saturday morning for some community service. The seventh-grader at La Cañada High School 7/8 was one of about 200 volunteers who beautified Muir Elementary School in Glendale last week. ?It?s nice to do service,? Chad said. ?It makes you happy.? It also made the school look brand new. Decaying fences were repainted and arid soil was replaced with fresh plants, flowers and much ? donated by the volunteers from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, school parents and community members.
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NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | September 9, 2010
It started with a book recommendation. La Cañada Flintridge resident Janet McNiff, 69, was at a spring check-up when her doctor suggested some dietary changes, and referred her to "Living Beyond Organic," by Christina Avaness. She and her husband Frank McNiff, 70, pored through its pages, experimenting with how to implement the many nutritional recommendations. And soon they were scouting their yard, at the corner of Vineta Avenue and Houseman Street, for an appropriate spot for a vegetable patch.
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FEATURES
By Max Zimbert | May 13, 2010
Thirteen-year-old Chad Anderson had no problem waking up early Saturday morning for some community service. The seventh-grader at La Cañada High School 7/8 was one of about 200 volunteers who beautified Muir Elementary School in Glendale last week. ?It?s nice to do service,? Chad said. ?It makes you happy.? It also made the school look brand new. Decaying fences were repainted and arid soil was replaced with fresh plants, flowers and much ? donated by the volunteers from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, school parents and community members.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 2, 2009
Engineers at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Tuesday filled a ramp full of powdery earth and slowly rolled a test rover onto the geological cocktail as they tried to simulate the rover Spirit’s unfortunate circumstance on Mars. Since May 6, the golf cart-sized Spirit has been embedded in an area on the west side of what scientists have named “Home Plate” on Mars. The rover’s wheels can still rotate but slip in the soft soil, so engineers won’t move it until they work out an extraction plan on Earth.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 26, 2008
On June 15, the Phoenix Mars Lander, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here, used its robotic arm to dig down into a trench called ?Dodo-Goldilocks.? As the arm scooped out soil samples it came upon dice-size clumps of bright, white material. The arm dropped the clumps to the side and scientists watched. Four days later the clumps had disappeared. ?They had been clearing out the trench area and found these few large clods. They looked light and [scientists thought] they could be ice or salt,?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 19, 2008
After 17 years, four times its expected mission lifetime, the Ulysses spacecraft is only a few weeks away from ending its exploration of the sun. According to Ed Smith, Ulysses project scientist at JPL, the main objective of the spacecraft was to study “from every angle, the heliosphere, which is the vast bubble in space carved out by the solar wind.” He credits Ulysses with redefining the knowledge of the heliosphere and “our solar neighborhood.” The spacecraft has flown over the sun’s poles three times.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 5, 2008
Since its Martian Memorial Day weekend touchdown, the Phoenix lander has been sending back pictures and data that have kept scientists and engineers busy. Although there have been some small glitches along the way, the bottom line is the Phoenix is fine and the team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is very happy, according to Mark Lemmon, camera team lead. The Phoenix website has been updated daily on the progress of the lander, with detailed photos that allow scientists and the world to see the arctic area they are investigating.
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