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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2006
Tues. 7 to 9 p.m., Jan. 10. -- In a free program, UCLA oncologist and hematologist, Dr. Richard Finn discusses evolving anti-cancer therapies. These therapies hold great promise for improving outcomes with little or no side effects. The presentation focuses on breaking down the complicated and rapidly changing vocabulary of oncology so that patients and their families have a better understanding of both traditional approaches to treating cancer and newer, innovative treatment options.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | October 12, 2011
Q. My mom's appetite has decreased lately and she is losing weight. What can I do to get her to eat more? A loss of appetite is very common in the senior community. Caregivers must be aware of their loved one's eating habits to ensure nutritional requirements are being met. Medications alter a body's ability to absorb nutrients from food, and also impair its natural process of excreting minerals. While this explains noticeable physical side effects to medication, another issue is the alteration of taste and smell that drugs may cause.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | November 25, 2010
Q. How do I know if a clinical trial is right for me and my chronic illness? Participating in a clinical trial can place you in the care of some of the nation's top physicians, and you may find a treatment that works. Naturally, you also are concerned about the risks involved. A clinical trial is a medical investigational study in which humans are observed and/or treated. The type of trial you might be interested in is a treatment trial which tests new treatments, new combinations of drugs, or new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy.
FEATURES
By Nancy Turney | October 1, 2009
Q. Last week you gave me some good ideas for ways to take proactive steps to help control my arthritis. Do you have any suggestions for long-term goals to make my life with arthritis a little easier? Last week you gave me some good ideas for ways to take proactive steps to help control my arthritis. Do you have any suggestions for long-term goals to make my life with arthritis a little easier? — Joe, La Cañada   Protect your joints Avoid excess stress on your joints.
CMIBACK
March 25, 2010
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NEWS
July 7, 2005
To the children and young adults who have been told you need a prescription drug to handle a behavior problem ?and to their parents: Certainly parents want to do the best for their children, so when a professional advises, we listen. I am challenging today that we are not always getting the best advice. "I want a second opinion" has not gone out-of-date. Let's use it. Start with asking, "A chemical imbalance? Can I see the lab test showing this? You know, blood test, saliva, anything?"
NEWS
By Seth Amitin | December 24, 2009
More than 100 teens and adults made a pledge Friday at La Cañada High School to not text messages on their cell phones while driving as part of Allstate Insurance’s “X the TXT” campaign. Allstate Insurance’s “X to TXT” truck, part of a national campaign designed to make teenagers and their parents pledge they won’t text while driving, has been touring the nation, stopping at local high schools. The truck made an appearance Friday night at La Cañada High during the La Cañada Classic, a high school boys’ basketball tournament.
NEWS
By Jack Scott State Senator Senate District 21 | June 14, 2007
Recently, when the New England Journal of Medicine announced that the diabetes drug Avandia could substantially increase the risk of heart attacks and deaths, the news caused a flurry of headlines and renewed calls for drug manufacturers to publicly disclose the results of clinical drug studies. This is just the latest drug crisis in a series of crises. That's why the consumer group CALPIRG is joining me in calling for improving drug safety by requiring all drug testing reports to be made available to the public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | October 12, 2011
Q. My mom's appetite has decreased lately and she is losing weight. What can I do to get her to eat more? A loss of appetite is very common in the senior community. Caregivers must be aware of their loved one's eating habits to ensure nutritional requirements are being met. Medications alter a body's ability to absorb nutrients from food, and also impair its natural process of excreting minerals. While this explains noticeable physical side effects to medication, another issue is the alteration of taste and smell that drugs may cause.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | November 25, 2010
Q. How do I know if a clinical trial is right for me and my chronic illness? Participating in a clinical trial can place you in the care of some of the nation's top physicians, and you may find a treatment that works. Naturally, you also are concerned about the risks involved. A clinical trial is a medical investigational study in which humans are observed and/or treated. The type of trial you might be interested in is a treatment trial which tests new treatments, new combinations of drugs, or new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy.
FEATURES
By Nancy Turney | October 1, 2009
Q. Last week you gave me some good ideas for ways to take proactive steps to help control my arthritis. Do you have any suggestions for long-term goals to make my life with arthritis a little easier? Last week you gave me some good ideas for ways to take proactive steps to help control my arthritis. Do you have any suggestions for long-term goals to make my life with arthritis a little easier? — Joe, La Cañada   Protect your joints Avoid excess stress on your joints.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2006
Tues. 7 to 9 p.m., Jan. 10. -- In a free program, UCLA oncologist and hematologist, Dr. Richard Finn discusses evolving anti-cancer therapies. These therapies hold great promise for improving outcomes with little or no side effects. The presentation focuses on breaking down the complicated and rapidly changing vocabulary of oncology so that patients and their families have a better understanding of both traditional approaches to treating cancer and newer, innovative treatment options.
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