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By Mary O'Keefe | August 31, 2006
With the recent reclassification of the planet formerly known as Pluto, pizza will no longer be delivered in the elementary schools' solar system poem. The pizza part of " M y V ery E xcellent M other J ust S erved U s N ine P izzas" (which stands for Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto) is no longer valid, according to the International Astronomical Union. After a long debate, the fate of Pluto was handed down on Aug. 24 during the IAU's conference.
FEATURES
By Mary O'Keefe | March 15, 2007
What could be better than a play dealing with the science of the solar system? A science play with kazoos. That musical instrument was just part of the charm of the play, "Star Search" performed by La Cañada Elementary school's third grade classes, on Wednesday, March 7. "The Sun goes on vacation because he is feeling burned out," said performer Kyle Ghaby. "The other planets try to find the Sun." With lines like, "Jupiter has a point" the play took the audience through the solar system, and introduced them to all the planets.
FEATURES
February 9, 2006
When La Cañada resident Elizabeth Jones scheduled her third graders' field trip to Jet Propulsion Laboratory last year, she had no idea that the date would coincide with the launching of NASA's "New Horizons" mission to the planet Pluto. "It was miraculous," Jones said. "I scheduled this field trip in September. Not only were we at JPL at the same time the launch was taking place, our tour group just happened to be in the observation area of the JPL Mission Control Room at the exact time of the launch.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 4, 2005
Scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech are continuing this week to review data related to the recent discovery of the tenth known planet in our solar system. Astronomers announced in a press conference held at JPL July 29 that a planet larger than Pluto has been discovered in one of the most distant regions of our solar system. JPL scientists will begin observing the new planet through the Spitzer telescope soon, according to a lab spokesperson. Caltech planetary scientist Mike Brown announced the planet's discovery, the tenth in our solar system.
NEWS
By Preston MacDougall | August 24, 2006
Once upon a time, theology scholars argued about how many angels could stand on the point of a pin. This isn't just a saying; numerous medieval scribes actually burned the midnight oil copying out proceedings of such debates. Nowadays, via the Internet, bloggers tell us all about an ongoing conference in Prague, where astronomy scholars are debating how many planets orbit our sun. At a meeting of the International Astronomers Union being held in the Czech capital, there are passionate supporters for popular answers such as "8," "9" and "10," as well as some authoritative voices positing "53 and counting."
COMMUNITY
By Carol Cormaci, carol.cormaci@latimes.com | February 13, 2013
Robert Haw, a JPL systems engineer who has worked on exploration missions spanning the solar system from Mercury to Pluto, was the featured speaker at the Feb. 6 meeting of Kiwanis Club of La Cañada. Using slides to illustrate his talk, Haw, the founder of the Climate Change Symposium at JPL, gave an overview of environmental changes over the past century and the role that man's use of coal has played in those changes. In other news, members of the club and the Key Club it sponsors at La Cañada High gathered Sunday in front of Ralphs market to sell peanuts in support of the Eliminate Project, a Kiwanis International program run in collaboration with UNICEF to eradicate maternal and neonatal tetanus.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Are sewers mandatory? Thanks for your excellent article in the August 23, 2007 issue [“Sewer education on city agenda”]. Mr. Kevin Chun, La Cañada’s director of administrative services, has now informed the homeowners of La Cañada that a public sewer system is not mandatory at this time. All reports coming from the State Water Resource Control Board indicate that septic tank sewer treatment systems are still being approved for longtime usage. Thus anticipated legislation of septic tank mass destruction in the future is highly speculative.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2005
Charly Shelton As Disneyland celebrates it's 50th Christmas season, Jack's Back with all his friends in the "Haunted Mansion Holiday", Snow falls every night during the fireworks show "Remember Dreams Come True", "Santa's Reindeer Round-Up" every day in Frontierland, "It's A Small World" celebrates the holidays across the world, and "A Christmas Fantasy" parade returns to the park for the Holiday Season. Some of these attractions are new this year and others are returning favorites, but all are sure fire hits for the whole family.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | June 2, 2005
Staff and friends of La Cañada's Jet Propulsion Laboratory appear to be somewhat reassured about their financial future after a visit last week from new NASA director Michael Griffin. Griffin, who once worked as an engineer at JPL, set off some alarms there during recent testimony before the Senate Appropriations subcommittee dealing with science. His meeting with local staffers calmed some of the fears, reminiscent of darker days at the lab in the 1990s. Griffin told the subcommittee, "NASA is fully funding - within our FY 2005 budget - the $762 million increase for returning the Space Shuttle safely to flight, over $400 million in Congressionally-directed items, $291 million for Hubble servicing, and over $500 million in necessary programmatic cost increases, notably to cover cost growth in several space science missions, including the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, scheduled to be launched this August, and the New Horizons mission to Pluto set to launch in early January 2006.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | July 8, 2012
With a clang of giant levers and the launch of a soda-bottle rocket, Kidspace Children's Museum is opening an expansive new outdoor playground that aims to make physics fun. The 30,000-square-foot Robert & Mary Galvin Physics Forest, debuting Thursday, offers 13 interactive exhibits that demonstrate fundamental scientific concepts and encourage hands-on learning. Velocity, trajectory and force are at work in a 50-foot rubber ball firing range. Potential energy becomes kinetic energy in the “roller coaster,” in which users must get a ball through a tangle of interchangeable tubes that include a loop-de-loop and other obstacles.
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FEATURES
By Mary O'Keefe | March 15, 2007
What could be better than a play dealing with the science of the solar system? A science play with kazoos. That musical instrument was just part of the charm of the play, "Star Search" performed by La Cañada Elementary school's third grade classes, on Wednesday, March 7. "The Sun goes on vacation because he is feeling burned out," said performer Kyle Ghaby. "The other planets try to find the Sun." With lines like, "Jupiter has a point" the play took the audience through the solar system, and introduced them to all the planets.
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NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 31, 2006
With the recent reclassification of the planet formerly known as Pluto, pizza will no longer be delivered in the elementary schools' solar system poem. The pizza part of " M y V ery E xcellent M other J ust S erved U s N ine P izzas" (which stands for Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto) is no longer valid, according to the International Astronomical Union. After a long debate, the fate of Pluto was handed down on Aug. 24 during the IAU's conference.
FEATURES
February 9, 2006
When La Cañada resident Elizabeth Jones scheduled her third graders' field trip to Jet Propulsion Laboratory last year, she had no idea that the date would coincide with the launching of NASA's "New Horizons" mission to the planet Pluto. "It was miraculous," Jones said. "I scheduled this field trip in September. Not only were we at JPL at the same time the launch was taking place, our tour group just happened to be in the observation area of the JPL Mission Control Room at the exact time of the launch.
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