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July 3, 2008
After scientists and engineers deliver a sample of Martian ice scraping to the Phoenix lander?s optical microscope today, they will take a break and enjoy the Fourth of July weekend. ?The science team will stand down,? said Sara Hammond, public affairs manager at University of Arizona. The Phoenix mission is led by Peter Smith from the University; Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge manages the project. The Phoenix team has been working on a Martian clock since the lander?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 5, 2008
Since its Martian Memorial Day weekend touchdown, the Phoenix lander has been sending back pictures and data that have kept scientists and engineers busy. Although there have been some small glitches along the way, the bottom line is the Phoenix is fine and the team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is very happy, according to Mark Lemmon, camera team lead. The Phoenix website has been updated daily on the progress of the lander, with detailed photos that allow scientists and the world to see the arctic area they are investigating.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 22, 2008
The Phoenix bird, born from fire and symbolizing rebirth, winged past the stars to a rendezvous with the Roman god of war, Mars. As in every great drama, the story will have the audience on the edge of their seats until the final conclusion. It may sound like an ancient play, but this drama is real and playing out this weekend at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Phoenix spacecraft, which was launched on Aug. 4, 2007, will reach its Martian destination shortly before 5 p.m. Pacific time Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charly Shelton | July 19, 2007
Wednesday, July 11, the Potter franchise struck again. "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix" opened to record breaking box office numbers, with a $12 million midnight screening, that Wednesday alone. In this fifth movie in the series of seven, Harry (Daniel Redcliffe) returns again to battle the forces of evil and the sinister Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) who has recently come out of hiding. Voldemort is building an army to battle the forces of good, in turn Harry, in conjunction with a secret wizard society called the Order of the Phoenix, builds his forces to do battle with the forces of naughtiness.
NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | May 27, 2010
Over the next few months, NASA scientists will begin to analyze information gathered by the Phoenix Mars Lander, whose mission ended earlier this week after repeated unsuccessful attempts to communicate with the craft. The announcement comes two years after the Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the Red Planet. The mission began on May 25, 2008, and lasted five months — two months beyond its operating expectancy, scientists said. "It did its job better than expected," said Dr. Deborah Bass, deputy project scientist for the Phoenix Mission.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 12, 2007
Two JPL managed missions are preparing for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. One, the Phoenix Mars Lander, is on schedule, the other, the Dawn Mission, has been delayed. Phoenix has a three-week launch schedule beginning on August 3 at 2:35 a.m. PST. The launch is dependent upon the Florida weather, which has been fraught with thunderstorms in the past weeks however the early morning launch time should be a benefit. The Phoenix will arrive at Mars in the spring of 2008.
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NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | May 27, 2010
Over the next few months, NASA scientists will begin to analyze information gathered by the Phoenix Mars Lander, whose mission ended earlier this week after repeated unsuccessful attempts to communicate with the craft. The announcement comes two years after the Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the Red Planet. The mission began on May 25, 2008, and lasted five months — two months beyond its operating expectancy, scientists said. "It did its job better than expected," said Dr. Deborah Bass, deputy project scientist for the Phoenix Mission.
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NEWS
July 3, 2008
After scientists and engineers deliver a sample of Martian ice scraping to the Phoenix lander?s optical microscope today, they will take a break and enjoy the Fourth of July weekend. ?The science team will stand down,? said Sara Hammond, public affairs manager at University of Arizona. The Phoenix mission is led by Peter Smith from the University; Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge manages the project. The Phoenix team has been working on a Martian clock since the lander?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 5, 2008
Since its Martian Memorial Day weekend touchdown, the Phoenix lander has been sending back pictures and data that have kept scientists and engineers busy. Although there have been some small glitches along the way, the bottom line is the Phoenix is fine and the team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is very happy, according to Mark Lemmon, camera team lead. The Phoenix website has been updated daily on the progress of the lander, with detailed photos that allow scientists and the world to see the arctic area they are investigating.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 29, 2008
The news vans, cameras and reporters are slowly moving out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory parking lot after a weekend of crossed fingers, lucky peanuts and amazing scientific and engineering achievement. Just before 5 p.m on Sunday the Phoenix spacecraft used its descent thrusters and landed on its three legs on the Martian surface, all according to plan. The landing procedure was last attempted in 1999 with the Mars Polar Lander but communication was lost with the spacecraft shortly before it entered Mars?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 22, 2008
The Phoenix bird, born from fire and symbolizing rebirth, winged past the stars to a rendezvous with the Roman god of war, Mars. As in every great drama, the story will have the audience on the edge of their seats until the final conclusion. It may sound like an ancient play, but this drama is real and playing out this weekend at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Phoenix spacecraft, which was launched on Aug. 4, 2007, will reach its Martian destination shortly before 5 p.m. Pacific time Sunday.
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