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Peafowl

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NEWS
December 8, 2011
As a former reporter and editor of the La Cañada Valley Sun for 39 years, I can relate to the ongoing episode of the pesky wild peafowl in La Cañada Flintridge. They came in the early 1900s when Kansas Judge Edwin W. Sargent purchased a 90-acre piece of property above Vista del Valle in the Angeles Crest Highway area and found the birds there. Frank P. Doherty, a prominent L.A. attorney, then bought the acreage from Sargent in 1936. The birds killed and ate the rattlesnakes, as much of a problem for LCF residents as the peacocks.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | October 23, 2008
La Cañada’s population explosion of peafowl was the primary topic of much of the more than five hours of discussion, debate and decisions Monday night as the City Council met before a packed house of residents for its regularly scheduled council meeting and public hearings. Dozens of area residents came with passionate and sometimes angry pleas and petitions on both sides of the peafowl issue. “We are not at risk of having the neighborhood dissolve into a fist fight,” said Lisa Phelan, an El Vago Street resident who led the charge to have peafowl removed from the city.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | May 15, 2008
It?s mating season for peafowl and some local neighborhoods are seeing a flurry of activity as the magnificent male birds strut their plumage and offer wooing calls of courtship to the less colorful females of the species. ?Ha-cawww, ha-cawww!? sounded Wednesday morning on rooftops and along fence lines of La Cañada?s El Vago Street. Neighbors in that area northeast of Angeles Crest Highway are divided on the subject of peacocks in this city. Some say the area was originally a large peacock farm that was subdivided and developed ?
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | January 22, 2009
The La Cañada Flintridge City Council moved ahead with several city projects and actions during its relatively short council meeting Tuesday night. The meeting was the first of the new year and included updates on city projects as well as information on the city?s plan to decrease the peafowl population. In an update by Kevin Chun, the city?s director of administrative services, the council learned that following a count of peafowl within the city, that number was reduced during the month of December through trapping from 40 to 19. This after the Oct. 20 council meeting, at which the council directed city staff to reduce the number of peacocks and peahen in area neighborhoods to accommodate resident complaints of health and safety concerns with the overpopulation of the birds.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | December 11, 2009
An ongoing battle over the city’s peafowl population escalated at the La Cañada Flintridge City Council meeting on Monday during which one resident hinted he wanted to shoot the birds and another called for the removal of the neighbors rather than her feathered friends. Mayor Laura Olhasso, Mayor Pro Tem Don Voss and Councilman Steve Del Guercio hesitantly decided to continue with the city’s peafowl management plan, rather than remove the flock from the area entirely.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | November 17, 2010
To some, the two dozen peafowl who remain wild in the hillside area above Angeles Crest Highway near tiny Glenola Park are inspiring for their novelty and beauty. To many others, the noisy, messy birds make for lousy neighbors. But neither side in the years-long debate over whether to allow wild peacocks and peahens to remain in La Cañada is likely to stop squawking anytime soon. Following a series of impassioned arguments from a dozen residents who spoke both for and against total peafowl removal, City Council members decided Monday to step up efforts to trap and relocate some of the birds — only not in great enough numbers to harm the flock's ability to reproduce, leaving neither side completely satisfied.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | July 17, 2008
At about 2:15 p.m., last Thursday (July 10) a suspect allegedly attacked a newer black Toyota Camry that was parked in front of a residence in the 1000 block of El Vago Street. The suspect caused damage to both sides and the front of the vehicle. A gardener next door to the residence witnessed the incident and quickly notified the homeowner. ?The gardener was really alarmed; he didn?t speak much English, but he pointed out [the suspect who] was standing within 25 feet of the car, in an aggressive stance,?
NEWS
By Carol Cormaci | October 23, 2008
Peafowl, mountain lions and coyotes, beware! Your days of harassing and attacking area pets and households might be numbered, as local citizens are banding together to effect your disappearance from our streets. The outcry was heard loud and clear during Monday night’s city council meeting. (Like some kind of junkie I tune into the community access TV channel for council meetings. I don’t advise you to get started unless you have a high tolerance for long hearings and don’t mind missing “Dancing with the Stars.
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COMMUNITY
September 14, 2012
Mother Nature must be punishing me. She knows that I hate being hot! Here we are in mid-September, still simmering because she just won't turn the burners down on her stove. This weekend we were sweltering in triple-digit degrees. It was pretty darn hot when concertgoers began to arrive at the Los Angeles Arboretum in Arcadia for last weekend's Pasadena Pops concert, all 3,000-plus of them. I know many of our local residents are not fond of peafowl, but the Arboretum does have an on-premise flock of these beautiful birds.
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NEWS
December 8, 2011
As a former reporter and editor of the La Cañada Valley Sun for 39 years, I can relate to the ongoing episode of the pesky wild peafowl in La Cañada Flintridge. They came in the early 1900s when Kansas Judge Edwin W. Sargent purchased a 90-acre piece of property above Vista del Valle in the Angeles Crest Highway area and found the birds there. Frank P. Doherty, a prominent L.A. attorney, then bought the acreage from Sargent in 1936. The birds killed and ate the rattlesnakes, as much of a problem for LCF residents as the peacocks.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | November 23, 2011
It's Thanksgiving, but turkeys aren't the only birds that are on the minds of La Cañada Flintridge residents who flocked to City Hall Monday night when the City Council took its annual look at the city's peafowl management plan. Of the dozen residents who made their voices heard on the issue during the meeting, seven said that the current plan isn't working, and that the flock, which is largely centered around Haskell Street and Vista Lejana Lane, needs to be removed. The city's current management plan dictates that the flock size be maintained at three peacocks and six peahens, with the excess birds being trapped and relocated by Mike Maxcy of the L.A. Zoo, at the city's expense.
NEWS
November 17, 2010
I am Dennis Fett, owner of the Peacock Information Center (peafowl.com) in Minden, Iowa. I was sad to read in your story posted online about all of the issues associated with the birds I love so much. Today my entire India Blue Peafowl flock comes from 24 peachicks rescued from your community in the 1990s. I might add that they are the best bloodline we have on our peacock farm and have produced well since then. I hope people on both sides of the issue will follow the city's Peafowl Management Plan.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | November 17, 2010
To some, the two dozen peafowl who remain wild in the hillside area above Angeles Crest Highway near tiny Glenola Park are inspiring for their novelty and beauty. To many others, the noisy, messy birds make for lousy neighbors. But neither side in the years-long debate over whether to allow wild peacocks and peahens to remain in La Cañada is likely to stop squawking anytime soon. Following a series of impassioned arguments from a dozen residents who spoke both for and against total peafowl removal, City Council members decided Monday to step up efforts to trap and relocate some of the birds — only not in great enough numbers to harm the flock's ability to reproduce, leaving neither side completely satisfied.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | December 11, 2009
An ongoing battle over the city’s peafowl population escalated at the La Cañada Flintridge City Council meeting on Monday during which one resident hinted he wanted to shoot the birds and another called for the removal of the neighbors rather than her feathered friends. Mayor Laura Olhasso, Mayor Pro Tem Don Voss and Councilman Steve Del Guercio hesitantly decided to continue with the city’s peafowl management plan, rather than remove the flock from the area entirely.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | January 22, 2009
The La Cañada Flintridge City Council moved ahead with several city projects and actions during its relatively short council meeting Tuesday night. The meeting was the first of the new year and included updates on city projects as well as information on the city?s plan to decrease the peafowl population. In an update by Kevin Chun, the city?s director of administrative services, the council learned that following a count of peafowl within the city, that number was reduced during the month of December through trapping from 40 to 19. This after the Oct. 20 council meeting, at which the council directed city staff to reduce the number of peacocks and peahen in area neighborhoods to accommodate resident complaints of health and safety concerns with the overpopulation of the birds.
NEWS
October 30, 2008
Letters to the Editor High fructose corn syrup facts offered The Oct. 23 article by Loa Blasucci, “All Health’s Breaking Loose: Trick? or Treat?,” may mislead consumers about high fructose corn syrup. High fructose corn syrup, sugar, and several fruit juices are all nutritionally the same. High fructose corn syrup has the same number of calories as sugar and is handled similarly by the body. The American Medical Association in June 2008 helped put to rest misunderstandings about this sweetener and obesity, stating that “high fructose corn syrup does not appear to contribute to obesity more than other caloric sweeteners.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | October 23, 2008
La Cañada’s population explosion of peafowl was the primary topic of much of the more than five hours of discussion, debate and decisions Monday night as the City Council met before a packed house of residents for its regularly scheduled council meeting and public hearings. Dozens of area residents came with passionate and sometimes angry pleas and petitions on both sides of the peafowl issue. “We are not at risk of having the neighborhood dissolve into a fist fight,” said Lisa Phelan, an El Vago Street resident who led the charge to have peafowl removed from the city.
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