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By Joe Puglia | January 1, 2009
Recently, a couple of buddies of mine came over to wish Kaitzer, the girls and me a happy new year. After some shooters of Clan MacGregor, my friends began to tell me of their New Year’s resolution. “Joe, we want to climb Mount Rainier in March.” My first reaction: they were nuts. “Joe, we need someone with winter mountaineering experience, especially on the ice.” “Where you gonna find someone like that?” I said. “Joe, you’ve done Rainier in the winter and you’ve got experience on ice.” My next thought: I was pretty crazy back then.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | October 19, 2006
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter scientists and engineers gathered together again at a press briefing held at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge on Monday. The purpose was to share the impressive images from the spacecraft's first week of photographing the surface of Mars. The panel consisted of Steve Saunders, program scientist, Scott Murchie, principal investigator for the spectrometer on the spacecraft, Alfred McEwen, the camera's principal investigator, Rich Zurek, project scientist, and Jim Graf, project manager.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 2, 2006
For those who have been impressed with what scientists have learned about Mars so far ? scientists from JPL-NASA with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter think they haven't seen anything yet. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is due to arrive on Mars at 1:25 p.m. March 10. This mission will provide information for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout, a spacecraft that will land in an icy area of Mars near the north polar ice cap. Its primary...
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | June 10, 2011
JPL scientists are celebrating the successful Friday morning launch of a satellite that will measure ocean salinity levels in an effort to track changing ocean currents and, by extension, increase understanding of global climate change. The Earth-orbiting Aquarius SAC-D satellite, a joint effort of JPL and Argentina’s space agency, was launched into space at 7:20 a.m. from Vandenberg Air Force Base aboard a Delta-2 rocket. “Everything went flawlessly,” said JPL Aquarius Project Manager Amit Sen. “About an hour after launch, we detected separation from the rocket and unfurled our solar panels, which give us the energy we need to operate while in orbit.” The Aquarius sea salinity measurement instrument was built by Sen’s team at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge and is housed in the Argentine-built SAC (Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas)
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 19, 2007
The search of life beyond Earth has filled the imagination of humans for centuries. The question of "Are we alone?" has inspired science fiction writers and scientists. The problem has been how to see those Earth-like planets that are so distant. It has been a Catch 22 situation: To find a twin to planet Earth it must be close to a twin Sun, however proximity to such a bright object blurs the vision of telescopes. That is until recently, when two JPL researchers began working a new type of telescope.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 16, 2006
Engineers are still attempting to contact the Mars Global Surveyor satellite through various methods utilizing other Mars explorers in a Martian rescue mission. The satellite stop relaying data to Earth just days before its 10th anniversary. "We first lost it on Nov. 2, then got it back on the fifth but lost it again," said Tom Thorpe, MGS project manager from JPL. The orbiter is the oldest of the five NASA spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars. Launched on Nov. 7, 1996 the MGS has operated longer than any other spacecraft that has been sent to the planet.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 16, 2006
A tiny Saturn moon has made a big splash at JPL. The Cassini spacecraft may have found evidence of liquid water reservoirs on the surface of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons. Cassini is the first spacecraft to explore the Saturn system from its orbit. Since entering Saturn's orbit on June 30, 2004, the spacecraft has sent data and images of not only the planet's rings but also of its many moons. High-resolution Cassini images showed icy jets and towering plumes ejecting large quantities of particles at a high speed.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 19, 2007
Having lost communication with Mars Global Surveyor late last year, JPL/NASA announced late last week that an internal board has determined the spacecraft was lost due to a series of events triggered after ground control in Denver sent an incorrect computer address. "There was not a single thing that happened," said Fuk Li, Mars exploration program manager at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge. "It was a series of events that caused the problem." MGS was launched in November 1996, and arrived at Mars to begin its mission in September 1997.
NEWS
July 1, 2004
News agencies from around the world joined local scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge as the Cassini-Huygens mission, managed by JPL, reached the end of its seven-year voyage to begin exploring Saturn this week. The historic mission, a cooperative project of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency, was poised yesterday to provide the closest images ever of Saturn and its moons. It was expected that at approximately 5 a.m. today (Thursday, July 1)
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | May 4, 2006
Singer Joni Mitchell may write that humans "really don't know clouds at all," but JPL scientists are about to change that with Friday's launch of two satellites whose mission is to reveal the inner secrets of clouds. CloudSat, managed by La Cañada's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is one of two spacecraft that will join three others in orbit around the Earth. The four will form the "A-Train" of weather and atmospheric satellites. The second satellite is Calipso, managed by Langley.
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NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | June 10, 2011
JPL scientists are celebrating the successful Friday morning launch of a satellite that will measure ocean salinity levels in an effort to track changing ocean currents and, by extension, increase understanding of global climate change. The Earth-orbiting Aquarius SAC-D satellite, a joint effort of JPL and Argentina’s space agency, was launched into space at 7:20 a.m. from Vandenberg Air Force Base aboard a Delta-2 rocket. “Everything went flawlessly,” said JPL Aquarius Project Manager Amit Sen. “About an hour after launch, we detected separation from the rocket and unfurled our solar panels, which give us the energy we need to operate while in orbit.” The Aquarius sea salinity measurement instrument was built by Sen’s team at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge and is housed in the Argentine-built SAC (Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas)
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NEWS
By Joe Puglia | January 1, 2009
Recently, a couple of buddies of mine came over to wish Kaitzer, the girls and me a happy new year. After some shooters of Clan MacGregor, my friends began to tell me of their New Year’s resolution. “Joe, we want to climb Mount Rainier in March.” My first reaction: they were nuts. “Joe, we need someone with winter mountaineering experience, especially on the ice.” “Where you gonna find someone like that?” I said. “Joe, you’ve done Rainier in the winter and you’ve got experience on ice.” My next thought: I was pretty crazy back then.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | October 19, 2006
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter scientists and engineers gathered together again at a press briefing held at JPL in La Cañada Flintridge on Monday. The purpose was to share the impressive images from the spacecraft's first week of photographing the surface of Mars. The panel consisted of Steve Saunders, program scientist, Scott Murchie, principal investigator for the spectrometer on the spacecraft, Alfred McEwen, the camera's principal investigator, Rich Zurek, project scientist, and Jim Graf, project manager.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | March 2, 2006
For those who have been impressed with what scientists have learned about Mars so far ? scientists from JPL-NASA with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter think they haven't seen anything yet. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is due to arrive on Mars at 1:25 p.m. March 10. This mission will provide information for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout, a spacecraft that will land in an icy area of Mars near the north polar ice cap. Its primary...
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