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NEWS
February 5, 2014
Re: “ Officials suggest customers limit water use ,” Quick Hits, Jan. 30. Bravo for the Foothill Municipal Water District calling for conservation. However, asking people to irrigate every other day ignores the larger problem of the ornamental, water-thirsty landscapes throughout La Cañada. Drought is normal for California and we don't have the water to waste on plants that feed neither people nor wildlife, particularly now that the State Water Project is cutting off allocations to public water agencies.
NEWS
By Peter Day | February 6, 2013
Volunteers spent half a day Saturday removing recently planted ivy seedlings from the Owl Trail entrance in Cherry Canyon and replacing them with sage, currant, lilac and other native plants. The effort was spearheaded by Lisa Novick, director of outreach and K-12 Education for the Sun Valley-based Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers & Native Plants. Volunteers from the La Cañada Flintridge Trails Council, Arroyo Seco Foundation and Boy Scouts also participated in the hillside replanting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Grace Farag | March 23, 2006
The Theodore Payne Foundation's third annual garden tour will take place April 1 and 2 this year, showcasing 31 private and public gardens throughout the Los Angeles Basin. One of those gardens belongs to Eric and Elisa Callow of La Cañada Flintridge, and they are pleased to be a part of the tour for the second year in a row. "It's fun," Elisa Callow said. "Garden people in general are people who enjoy themselves." She adds that the people who attend are often very knowledgeable, so there is a lot of tip-swapping and advice-giving.
NEWS
By Lisa Novick | July 19, 2012
We are substantially increasing our town's fire risk by the installation of various invasive and/or non-native plants in public and private spaces. In gardens throughout La Cañada, invasive non-native grasses and Queen palms (among others) are being installed for ornament, but these plants invite potentially devastating consequences. Fountain grass (pennisetum setaceum) and Mexican feather grass (nasella tenuissima) dry out and catch fire 100 times faster than native grasses because these non-natives do not store water as efficiently as the deeply-rooted and evolutionarily-adapted California native bunch grasses.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 10, 2012
For the first time in nearly two decades, Descanso Gardens is expanding - planning a four-acre collection of native oaks, shrubs and grasses. “It's almost what Descanso was before humans started cultivating plants here,” said Brian Sullivan, Descanso's director of horticulture. “What we're creating is the feeling of the landscape before people moved in.” The proposed woodland area has been closed to the public for decades and until recently was invaded by non-native eucalyptus trees.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | January 14, 2010
In a neighborhood of crisp green lawns and colorful rose bushes, Don and Denise Hahn’s yard is a lesson in subtlety. Clumps of wild-looking grasses sit next to spiky aloe plants which rest under the shade of palo verde trees, all of which melts into the natural vista of the foothills. “I am just a regionalist,” Denise Hahn said. “Everything should look like it is in Southern California. I think it is ridiculous to waste water on sod that doesn’t want to be here in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2007
Native Plants — Saturday, Aug. 25, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Discover the science and art of garden maintenance. Keep your garden healthy and looking good. How to diagnose cultural issues (too much water, or not enough?) as well as identify some common pests and diseases. $35 for members, $45 for nonmembers. To reserve, call 768-1802. Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers and Native Plants, 10459 Tuxford Street, Sun Valley.   Ice Cream Social — Saturday, Aug. 18, 1 to 4 p.m. The Glendale library celebrates its centennial anniversary with an old-fashioned ice cream social.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | December 14, 2007
The rain of last weekend and cool temperatures may fit well with the holiday season in La Cañada. But be warned, the wet stuff did not bring Southern California out of its ongoing dry spell in a meaningful way, according to the experts. “Right now we have had a little storm and we will be at normal [rainfall for the season]. That’s the good news,” said Bill Patzert, climatologist and oceanographer from Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “But normal doesn’t cut it in terms of the drought.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2014
Re: “ Officials suggest customers limit water use ,” Quick Hits, Jan. 30. Bravo for the Foothill Municipal Water District calling for conservation. However, asking people to irrigate every other day ignores the larger problem of the ornamental, water-thirsty landscapes throughout La Cañada. Drought is normal for California and we don't have the water to waste on plants that feed neither people nor wildlife, particularly now that the State Water Project is cutting off allocations to public water agencies.
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NEWS
By Peter Day | February 6, 2013
Volunteers spent half a day Saturday removing recently planted ivy seedlings from the Owl Trail entrance in Cherry Canyon and replacing them with sage, currant, lilac and other native plants. The effort was spearheaded by Lisa Novick, director of outreach and K-12 Education for the Sun Valley-based Theodore Payne Foundation for Wild Flowers & Native Plants. Volunteers from the La Cañada Flintridge Trails Council, Arroyo Seco Foundation and Boy Scouts also participated in the hillside replanting.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | October 10, 2012
For the first time in nearly two decades, Descanso Gardens is expanding - planning a four-acre collection of native oaks, shrubs and grasses. “It's almost what Descanso was before humans started cultivating plants here,” said Brian Sullivan, Descanso's director of horticulture. “What we're creating is the feeling of the landscape before people moved in.” The proposed woodland area has been closed to the public for decades and until recently was invaded by non-native eucalyptus trees.
NEWS
By Lisa Novick | July 19, 2012
We are substantially increasing our town's fire risk by the installation of various invasive and/or non-native plants in public and private spaces. In gardens throughout La Cañada, invasive non-native grasses and Queen palms (among others) are being installed for ornament, but these plants invite potentially devastating consequences. Fountain grass (pennisetum setaceum) and Mexican feather grass (nasella tenuissima) dry out and catch fire 100 times faster than native grasses because these non-natives do not store water as efficiently as the deeply-rooted and evolutionarily-adapted California native bunch grasses.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe-piasecki@latimes.com | March 30, 2011
Home to almost exclusively water-saving native plants, Lisa Novick’s La Cañada Flintridge backyard is alive with the sound of birds and is a kaleidoscope of color. In a city known for expansive and obsessively uniform golf-course green lawns, it’s also an anomaly. You might even call it a protest. Novick, who has installed a rainwater catchment system to reduce her reliance on imported water, believes Foothills residents — who collectively use 1 billion gallons of water or more each year for irrigation purposes alone — would benefit from growing stronger ties to the natural world.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | January 14, 2010
In a neighborhood of crisp green lawns and colorful rose bushes, Don and Denise Hahn’s yard is a lesson in subtlety. Clumps of wild-looking grasses sit next to spiky aloe plants which rest under the shade of palo verde trees, all of which melts into the natural vista of the foothills. “I am just a regionalist,” Denise Hahn said. “Everything should look like it is in Southern California. I think it is ridiculous to waste water on sod that doesn’t want to be here in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ruth Longoria | April 23, 2009
Even if you haven’t had a chance to create the perfect garden oasis in your backyard, there’s no reason to miss out on reaping the benefits of the spring sunshine that has recently caused flowers and foliage to blossom. La Cañada Valley Beautiful’s annual Spring Garden Tour is from 1 to 4 p.m., Sunday, and features four local backyard beauties, as well as the new Mediterranean and California native plant gardens at the La Cañada Public Library. Admission is $10 and tickets can be purchased at each of the locations on the day of the tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008
ACTIVITIES GONE ( Group Outdoor Nature Experience ) — March 29. Meet for a bike ride of the Santa Fe Dam and San Gabriel River Trail. Great for all non-century riders! This free event is open to the community. Contact Dodie Hall at dodiespin@hotmail.com for additional information.   BOOK READINGS Marla Frazee — March 30 at 1 p.m . National bestselling author/illustrator Marla Frazee will introduce and sign her latest children’s book “A Couple of Boys Have the Best Week Ever.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | December 14, 2007
The rain of last weekend and cool temperatures may fit well with the holiday season in La Cañada. But be warned, the wet stuff did not bring Southern California out of its ongoing dry spell in a meaningful way, according to the experts. “Right now we have had a little storm and we will be at normal [rainfall for the season]. That’s the good news,” said Bill Patzert, climatologist and oceanographer from Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “But normal doesn’t cut it in terms of the drought.
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