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National Pork Board

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2007
Anytime a fat envelope shows up in my mailbox from the National Pork Board, I can't get it open fast enough. Make no mistake. I love my beef. If the folks who promote beef mailed me packets as intriguing as those the pork people send, I'd share them with you. But they don't. Centered in Iowa, the pork board announces every year that barbecue season opens on Memorial Day, in spite of the fact that one of their studies showed that a small percentage of Midwesterners are so fond of grilling that they claim that they have barbecued outside during snowstorms.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2006
My first encounter with the mysteries of recipe development occurred when I was around eight or nine years old. In the tiny kitchen of our stucco bungalow on Patterson Avenue in Glendale, I would sit on a shiny chrome chair upholstered in mottled grey, easy-care plastic. On my lap, I held a cookbook or recipe box. While my mom stood a few feet away, stirring pots on the O'Keefe and Merritt gas range, I read recipe ingredient lists to her. The goal was to stump my mom. Could she guess the dish?
FEATURES
By Lynn Duvall | April 6, 2006
The National Pork Board has dubbed Hernando De Soto "the father of the American Pork Industry." De Soto landed in Tampa Bay, Fla. with 13 pigs in 1539. Three years later, the pork population had grown to a herd of 700. Cortez brought hogs to New Mexico in 1600 and Sir Walter Raleigh sailed sows into Jamestown Colony in 1607. Some of the early American porcine settlers ran away from their owners and established their own colonies, foraging on the land. Dutch settlers on Manhattan island had to build a wall to protect themselves against herds of marauding feral pigs, descendants of the first hog colonists.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2004
Dining With Duvall By Lynn Duvall The national pork board conducted a survey of more than 1,500 primary meal preparers across America to uncover the connection between food and family mealtime. They found that seven out of 10 families eat dinner at least four times per week. Most Americans prefer to include very few ingredients in every day dishes. Less than six ingredients are ideal according to 90 percent of the respondents. Meal preparers spent more time preparing the meal than actually enjoying it with their family.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2007
Anytime a fat envelope shows up in my mailbox from the National Pork Board, I can't get it open fast enough. Make no mistake. I love my beef. If the folks who promote beef mailed me packets as intriguing as those the pork people send, I'd share them with you. But they don't. Centered in Iowa, the pork board announces every year that barbecue season opens on Memorial Day, in spite of the fact that one of their studies showed that a small percentage of Midwesterners are so fond of grilling that they claim that they have barbecued outside during snowstorms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2006
My first encounter with the mysteries of recipe development occurred when I was around eight or nine years old. In the tiny kitchen of our stucco bungalow on Patterson Avenue in Glendale, I would sit on a shiny chrome chair upholstered in mottled grey, easy-care plastic. On my lap, I held a cookbook or recipe box. While my mom stood a few feet away, stirring pots on the O'Keefe and Merritt gas range, I read recipe ingredient lists to her. The goal was to stump my mom. Could she guess the dish?
FEATURES
By Lynn Duvall | April 13, 2006
The National Pork Board has dubbed Hernando De Soto "the father of the American Pork Industry." De Soto landed in Tampa Bay, Fla. with 13 pigs in 1539. Three years later, the pork population had grown to a herd of 700. Cortez brought hogs to New Mexico in 1600 and Sir Walter Raleigh sailed sows into Jamestown Colony in 1607. Some of the early American porcine settlers ran away from their owners and established their own colonies, foraging on the land. Dutch settlers on Manhattan island had to build a wall to protect themselves against herds of marauding feral pigs, descendants of the first hog colonists.
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