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NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | December 28, 2010
Some 3,600 cubic yards of mud and debris deposited this week by more than a foot of rainfall in Station fire burn areas is being hauled out of the Mullally debris basin — enough to generate about 360 truck trips, said L.A. County Department of Public Works spokesman Bob Spencer. The cleanout is expected to continue into Friday at Mullally, located along Manistee Drive near the top of Ocean View Boulevard, even if temporarily halted for light rainfall expected in the area this week.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | February 7, 2010
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger toured the tattered Paradise Valley neighborhood in La Cañada Flintridge Sunday morning, meeting property owners affected by Saturday?s mudslides and promising a coordinated cleanup effort. Flanked by La Cañada Mayor Laura Olhasso, Supervisor Mike Antonovich, Rep. David Dreier (R-San Dimas), State Assemblyman Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) and dozens of members of the media, Schwarzenegger promised to fast-track a state permit for a fourth dumping site needed to dispose of the truckloads of mud that overwhelmed the foothill neighborhood.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil | November 13, 2009
FOR ADDITIONAL PHOTOS, CLICK HERE. LA CAÑADA — A brief but intense rainstorm late Thursday night sent mud and rocks into the streets of several hillside neighborhoods, damaging cars and flooding half a dozen homes. The storm dropped 1 to 2 inches of rain in less than 20 minutes, fire officials said, enough to loosen the fire-damaged slopes above La Crescenta and La Cañada Flintridge. About 11 p.m., mud began pouring over cement barriers installed last month by Los Angeles County Public Works crews, filling some streets and seeping into yards and homes.
NEWS
June 23, 2012
Nobody moved to La Cañada Flintridge to live with concrete barriers lining their streets as though the family had chosen to bivouac at the edge of a battleground. But everybody who lives in La Cañada Flintridge knows or will likely come to know the glories and dangers of living at the edge of the wilderness. The San Gabriel Mountains send torrents of mud downhill on a regular basis. They did so when Los Angeles was just a little pueblo, and they will continue to do so for centuries.
NEWS
By Dan Evans | March 4, 2010
Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies went door to door in the foothills Friday night, telling residents of 224 homes that they needed to evacuate. Again. The call was the sixth of its type since January, and a call that La Cañada Flintridge residents Lyn and Bud Slotky had heeded five times before. Not this time. “After Feb. 6, we saw where the mud was going to flow,” Bud told me, explaining his and his wife’s reason for staying. “We’re at risk, but not high risk.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | February 9, 2010
Charles Woodhouse awoke early Saturday morning to the roar of rushing water. Debris, loosened from the hillsides by a heavy rainstorm, was snaking down Angeles Crest Highway and spilling into his Arroyo Summit Drive cul-de-sac. Mud filled the street, overwhelmed his driveway and seeped into the house, Woodhouse said. No sooner had the rain stopped, however, than car loads of community members, most of them fellow members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, began arriving to help.
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NEWS
By Abby Sewell | October 28, 2013
Los Angeles County flood control officials presented several options for removing built-up debris and mud from a basin above Devil's Gate Dam in northern Pasadena in a draft environmental impact report released Thursday . The basin became choked by mud and debris after the 2009 Station fire and storms that followed. Flood control officials have warned for years that the buildup compromises the dam's ability to contain debris and floodwater in another major storm, the Los Angeles Times reported . Officials say locations downstream from the dam along the Arroyo Seco that could be in danger of flooding include the Rose Bowl, 110 Freeway, neighborhoods in Pasadena and South Pasadena, and the northeastern Los Angeles communities of Highland Park, Hermon, Montecito Heights, Mount Washington and Cypress Park.
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NEWS
May 6, 2013
Three years after the Station fire denuded the hills above La Cañada Flintridge, a federal agency has determined that important earth-holding vegetation has recovered to the point that bulky concrete barriers put in place to protect homes from mudflows are no longer needed. The barriers, known as K-rails, were installed in 2010 one year after mudflows ravaged hillside properties when rains hit the Station fire burn area with nothing to hold the topsoil in place. But three years later, the barriers have started to outstay their welcome among residents who say they're ugly and creating their own set of driving hazards.
NEWS
June 23, 2012
Nobody moved to La Cañada Flintridge to live with concrete barriers lining their streets as though the family had chosen to bivouac at the edge of a battleground. But everybody who lives in La Cañada Flintridge knows or will likely come to know the glories and dangers of living at the edge of the wilderness. The San Gabriel Mountains send torrents of mud downhill on a regular basis. They did so when Los Angeles was just a little pueblo, and they will continue to do so for centuries.
NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | January 26, 2011
Some of my friends don't understand why I signed up for the Camp Pendleton Mud Run. My husband did not sign up. Our daughter did not sign up. Some days, I have trouble remembering why I signed up. The Marines describe the "world-famous" mud run as "a challenging 10K run with hills, tire obstacles, river crossings, two 5-foot walls with mud on both sides, tunnel crawl, slippery hill climb, and the final 30-foot mud pit. " Penelope Glifort, from...
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | December 28, 2010
Some 3,600 cubic yards of mud and debris deposited this week by more than a foot of rainfall in Station fire burn areas is being hauled out of the Mullally debris basin — enough to generate about 360 truck trips, said L.A. County Department of Public Works spokesman Bob Spencer. The cleanout is expected to continue into Friday at Mullally, located along Manistee Drive near the top of Ocean View Boulevard, even if temporarily halted for light rainfall expected in the area this week.
NEWS
By Carol Cormaci | October 28, 2010
No wonder we have a dearth of strong candidates every time a general election takes place in this state. Who in their right mind wants to put themselves through the filthy, mud-slinging campaigns that begin before the ink is even dry on their filing papers and then crescendo the weekend before voters go to the polls? I am sick of the negative TV and radio political ads that assault me in my home and in my car. Those in the Whitman vs. Brown and Boxer vs. Fiorina races are the most obnoxious of them all this year.
NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | August 4, 2010
I am old. I am out of shape. That's why I've signed up for the 5K portion of the Buffalo Alley Run at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton. But first, a disclaimer. They call it the Buffalo Alley 5K Run. I call it the Buffalo Alley 5K Walk . If I train hard enough, it might be the Buffalo Alley 5K Run/Walk . Nowadays, the Buffalo Alley Run honors the fallen and wounded. The 5K is a spinoff of the 10K, which was formerly known as the "Horno Ridge Run." According to organizers, the new 10K offers the "ultimate" in Hard Corps Competition in a cross-country 10K. The course begins at Camp Horno, home of 1st Marines, and winds up, up, up, into the hills of Camp Pendleton.
NEWS
By Dan Evans | March 4, 2010
Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies went door to door in the foothills Friday night, telling residents of 224 homes that they needed to evacuate. Again. The call was the sixth of its type since January, and a call that La Cañada Flintridge residents Lyn and Bud Slotky had heeded five times before. Not this time. “After Feb. 6, we saw where the mud was going to flow,” Bud told me, explaining his and his wife’s reason for staying. “We’re at risk, but not high risk.
NEWS
February 18, 2010
Letters to the Editor Is someone ensuring safety of dump trucks? I know the parade of dump trucks going up and down Angeles Crest Highway today is necessary for the removal of tons of mud and muck from catch basins. I know the catch basins are there to protect us from debris flows and the rain that runs off from the mountains. But is someone, some city official, some government agency monitoring the parade of trucks? Is someone verifying that these trucks are safe?
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | February 11, 2010
Evacuated burn area residents returned home Wednesday and resumed cleanup efforts following destructive debris flows that occurred over the weekend. They were joined by hundreds of county workers, operating a fleet of dump trucks and other heavy equipment, who are excavating 28 debris basins. “We have prioritized the cleaning-out process and obviously we are looking at cleaning out the smaller ones first,” said Bob Spencer, spokesman for Los Angeles County Public Works.
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