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By Andrew Shortall, andrew.shortall@latimes.com | February 8, 2011
St. George’s Preschool looked more like farm than a school last week. That because students there participated in a farm-themed week. There were opportunities throughout the week to help create and paint a cardboard barn, make butter, bread and popcorn, plant vegetables, wash clothes on old-fashioned washboards and milk a wooden “cow” complete with an udder constructed from a latex glove holding real milk. Pony Horses and Petting Zoo, a company out of Northridge, brought the highlight of the week, though — a visit from live animals on Feb. 3 and 4. Students from ages 3 to 5 got the chance to milk a goat and learn and feed the other animals on campus, including an alpaca and sheep.
FEATURES
By Mary O'Keefe | November 16, 2006
"City folk" students at Palm Crest Elementary learned a little bit about where their milk comes from with the help of the Dairy Council of California. "This is Annie," said Efrain Valenzuela, Mobile Dairy Classroom instructor. Students "awwwed" and giggled at Annie the diary cow as Valenzuela explained the "ins" and even the "outs" of diary cows. "This brown and white cow is known as a Guernsey," Valenzuela said, introducing another gentle bovine. He continued to teach the students everything from cattle terms to how the milk gets from cow to carton.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | June 21, 2007
Fifty years ago Palm Crest Elementary opened its doors to 217 students, kindergarten through sixth grade. Throughout this school year the past and present have been felt up and down the hallways of the Palm Drive campus as students heard stories about the history of their school. In honor of the 50th anniversary, students from the present prepared memories for those who will follow in their academic footsteps. Last Friday the students, with help from parents, teachers and administrators placed 2006-'07 memorabilia into a time capsule.
FEATURES
February 8, 2007
A herd of milk cows, a flock of sheep, a battalion of "hugging Christian grannies" and enough school supplies to fill a warehouse. These were all part of the final accounting for the Christmas Market at La Cañada Presbyterian Church, an outreach project that raised $102,361 for needy causes around the world and across the Arroyo Seco. "God gets all the credit for this," said the Rev. Jim Milley, associate pastor for outreach and equipping at La Cañada Presbyterian Church. Contributions were up a staggering 76 percent from the previous year's Christmas Market, which meant a number of the church's ministry partners got a much-needed boost.
NEWS
By Susan Stefun | January 29, 2009
La Cañada High School students returning from winter break in January saw some changes in the school menu. Former a la carte items such as churros and funnel cakes; as well as Snapple drinks and Coca-Cola Vitamin Water were removed from the menu because they did not meet the new, more stringent standards imposed by the new state laws. Gatorade remains on the menu because it classifies as an electrolyte replacement beverage. According to dietitian Emily Burson, of Sodexo, the district’s food service consultant, Senate Bill 12 regulates what can be sold a la carte according to fat, sugar and calorie content; and individually-sold entrees must qualify under the federal meal program, be 400 calories or less and contain 4 grams or less of fat per 100 calories.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2009
Bill Clinton wore one. So did Martha Stewart, Beyoncé, Elton John and Suze Orman. They made milk mustaches fashionable. But even before we ?got? it, milk was already a longtime comfort food for most of us?heck, we were weaned on it. Many populations around the globe don?t touch it after childhood. But we Americans have it in our main meals, on cereal, in lattes, in ice cream and we continue to drink it into adulthood. Scientists agree that after the age of 35, bone mass does not increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2007
Lynn Duvall Cinco de Mayo commemorates the date of May 5, 1862, when Mexican armies fought a decisive battle against the French in the city of Puebla. After the Mexican-American War, a new constitution and government brought democracy to Mexico. Large landowners, frightened of losing their land, invited Spain, England and France to help them maintain power. Mexico had borrowed heavily from those nations to finance the Mexican-American War; the creditors came to Mexico to collect their debts.
FEATURES
May 20, 2010
The Palm Crest Elementary School campus is going “tiki-tiki” Saturday for the PTA carnival known as Springamajig. Hours for the event are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be rides, games, food, a silent auction and a talent show. Springamajig Goes Tiki-Tiki is Palm Crest’s annual fundraiser, with the money raised dedicated to enriching our students’ educational experiences. Rides at the event include Kidopolis, Giant Water Slide, Robo Surger, Rock Wall and Shark Attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2005
Making a Pie Doesn't Have to be a Killjoy I read cookbooks the way others read a volume of poems or short stories. A good recipe has rhythm and style. The simpler the recipe, the more the ingredients must be perfectly balanced. It is easy to hide a few mistakes when you're working with 12 ingredients, making a stew or soup, but vegetables and salads, in particular, require exactness. Maya Angelou produced a cookbook last year at the urging of her friend, Oprah Winfrey, that is a glorious celebration of her life.
NEWS
By Loa Blasucci | June 8, 2011
We’re a nation of consumers. I am fascinated by the number of products that appeal to our senses because of their names. Names like “energy bar” or “sports drink.” The names alone suggest we may need them if we want to participate in sports or have energy. But a closer look leaves me in awe of the power of marketing. With around 250 calories, 9 grams of fat and nearly 20 grams of sugar, some energy bars are surprisingly similar to a Snickers bar. But something about eating a candy bar in the afternoon is going to give me a whole lot more guilt than eating something called an energy bar. We buy sports drinks thinking we need electrolytes, and for a high performance athlete, who has practiced vigorously for an hour or more, replacing fluids with electrolytes is a good idea.
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NEWS
By Andrew Shortall, andrew.shortall@latimes.com | February 8, 2011
St. George’s Preschool looked more like farm than a school last week. That because students there participated in a farm-themed week. There were opportunities throughout the week to help create and paint a cardboard barn, make butter, bread and popcorn, plant vegetables, wash clothes on old-fashioned washboards and milk a wooden “cow” complete with an udder constructed from a latex glove holding real milk. Pony Horses and Petting Zoo, a company out of Northridge, brought the highlight of the week, though — a visit from live animals on Feb. 3 and 4. Students from ages 3 to 5 got the chance to milk a goat and learn and feed the other animals on campus, including an alpaca and sheep.
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NEWS
By Susan Stefun | January 29, 2009
La Cañada High School students returning from winter break in January saw some changes in the school menu. Former a la carte items such as churros and funnel cakes; as well as Snapple drinks and Coca-Cola Vitamin Water were removed from the menu because they did not meet the new, more stringent standards imposed by the new state laws. Gatorade remains on the menu because it classifies as an electrolyte replacement beverage. According to dietitian Emily Burson, of Sodexo, the district’s food service consultant, Senate Bill 12 regulates what can be sold a la carte according to fat, sugar and calorie content; and individually-sold entrees must qualify under the federal meal program, be 400 calories or less and contain 4 grams or less of fat per 100 calories.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | June 21, 2007
Fifty years ago Palm Crest Elementary opened its doors to 217 students, kindergarten through sixth grade. Throughout this school year the past and present have been felt up and down the hallways of the Palm Drive campus as students heard stories about the history of their school. In honor of the 50th anniversary, students from the present prepared memories for those who will follow in their academic footsteps. Last Friday the students, with help from parents, teachers and administrators placed 2006-'07 memorabilia into a time capsule.
FEATURES
February 8, 2007
A herd of milk cows, a flock of sheep, a battalion of "hugging Christian grannies" and enough school supplies to fill a warehouse. These were all part of the final accounting for the Christmas Market at La Cañada Presbyterian Church, an outreach project that raised $102,361 for needy causes around the world and across the Arroyo Seco. "God gets all the credit for this," said the Rev. Jim Milley, associate pastor for outreach and equipping at La Cañada Presbyterian Church. Contributions were up a staggering 76 percent from the previous year's Christmas Market, which meant a number of the church's ministry partners got a much-needed boost.
FEATURES
By Mary O'Keefe | November 16, 2006
"City folk" students at Palm Crest Elementary learned a little bit about where their milk comes from with the help of the Dairy Council of California. "This is Annie," said Efrain Valenzuela, Mobile Dairy Classroom instructor. Students "awwwed" and giggled at Annie the diary cow as Valenzuela explained the "ins" and even the "outs" of diary cows. "This brown and white cow is known as a Guernsey," Valenzuela said, introducing another gentle bovine. He continued to teach the students everything from cattle terms to how the milk gets from cow to carton.
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