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Memory Loss

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By Nancy Turney | November 2, 2011
Q. My mom, who lives with us, has Alzheimer's disease. She barely speaks anymore and I wonder if she understands anything that is going on around her. People with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of memory loss often seem to live in a different reality or a different time and place. Despite this disconnect, we should not simply dismiss a person as “gone,” or focus so narrowly on all the abilities that the person has lost. Instead, we must focus on the uniqueness of each person and bring an open mind to how we address their needs - the basic human needs we all share.
NEWS
July 10, 2008
Reducing risk of dementia program The Alzheimer’s Association and the Crescenta-Cañada YMCA presents “Healthy Body, Healthy Brain,” a program designed to reduce risk of memory loss on Wednesday, July 16 from noon to 1 p.m. at the YMCA, 1930 Foothill Blvd., La Cañada. The event will present information on how to learn to take care of your body, and therefore your brain, which can reduce the risk of memory problems. Founded on the premise that “what is good for the body is good for the brain,” the program will present steps that can be taken to reduce risks of vascular dementia (memory loss due to a stroke or series of strokes)
NEWS
November 2, 2006
The Alzheimer's Foundation of America has designated Nov. 14 as "National Memory Screening Day." Memory screenings make sense for anyone concerned about memory loss or experiencing warning signs of dementia; whose family and friends have noticed changes in them; or who believe they are at risk due to a family history of Alzheimer's disease or a related illness. The Crescenta-Cañada YMCA and Verdugo Hills Hospital are teaming up to offer free, confidential memory screenings to people in the community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | July 6, 2011
Q. My mom was just diagnosed with the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. She would like to stay in her home as long as possible. What can I do to help her achieve this goal? She can continue to live independently during the early stages of the disease by making simple adjustments, taking safety precautions and having the support of others. Here are some suggestions: Have her get help with daily tasks. Perhaps you or another family member or a close friend can take care of everyday activities like shopping, cooking, bill paying and housekeeping.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2007
The international Off-Broadway sensation 'Menopause The Musical,' the hilarious celebration of women and The Change, is returning Sept. 6 for a limited run at the Coronet Theatre, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., Los Angeles. Tickets are on sale now, starting at $46 plus handling fees and can be purchased by calling the box office at (310) 657-7377, online at www.TicketMaster.com, or at the box office during regular hours. Group discounts are available by contacting (323) 464-2088. Showtimes are 2 p.m. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 4 and 8 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays.
FEATURES
March 12, 2009
Q. I am worried about getting forgetful. What constitutes normal memory loss with aging and when should I be concerned that I might have Alzheimer?s? I am worried about getting forgetful. What constitutes normal memory loss with aging and when should I be concerned that I might have Alzheimer?s? ? Dan, La Cañada ? Aging may affect memory by changing the way the brain stores information and by making it harder to recall stored information. Your short-term and remote memories aren?
NEWS
July 29, 2004
People often call other people old if they either look old or dress old. Others, in an effort to patronize elders, refer to age as just a number. Well, the true measure of old age is how one thinks and feels. There is a test that anyone who thinks they're old can take. If you answer "yes" to four out of the six questions, then you can consider yourself old. 1. Do you suffer from instant memory loss? For example, do you find yourself asking a question and then forgetting what you asked?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | May 25, 2011
Q. My 80-year-old mom was recently hospitalized and has been very confused since she was released. Is this normal? Yes, this is a common occurrence, especially since people are discharged from the hospital sooner than in the past. Hospitalization of seniors may cause temporary memory loss, along with difficulty understanding discharge instructions. She will probably return to normal within a month. You should contact her doctor if you don’t see an improvement. As you have witnessed, seniors may need extra support from health workers and family immediately after they're released from the hospital.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | February 19, 2009
As the Mars rovers deal with advanced age, broken appendages and memory lapses, good news comes from Jet Propulsion Laboratory: the rover named Spirit had a little power boost, thanks to a Martian wind. Solar panels convert the Sun?s rays into power for the rovers. The more dust that covers the panels, the less power gets through. A Martian wind this month has blown away some of the dust that had accumulated on the panels, giving Spirit a very important uptick in electrical output.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | November 2, 2011
Q. My mom, who lives with us, has Alzheimer's disease. She barely speaks anymore and I wonder if she understands anything that is going on around her. People with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of memory loss often seem to live in a different reality or a different time and place. Despite this disconnect, we should not simply dismiss a person as “gone,” or focus so narrowly on all the abilities that the person has lost. Instead, we must focus on the uniqueness of each person and bring an open mind to how we address their needs - the basic human needs we all share.
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NEWS
July 10, 2008
Reducing risk of dementia program The Alzheimer’s Association and the Crescenta-Cañada YMCA presents “Healthy Body, Healthy Brain,” a program designed to reduce risk of memory loss on Wednesday, July 16 from noon to 1 p.m. at the YMCA, 1930 Foothill Blvd., La Cañada. The event will present information on how to learn to take care of your body, and therefore your brain, which can reduce the risk of memory problems. Founded on the premise that “what is good for the body is good for the brain,” the program will present steps that can be taken to reduce risks of vascular dementia (memory loss due to a stroke or series of strokes)
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