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July 3, 2008
After scientists and engineers deliver a sample of Martian ice scraping to the Phoenix lander?s optical microscope today, they will take a break and enjoy the Fourth of July weekend. ?The science team will stand down,? said Sara Hammond, public affairs manager at University of Arizona. The Phoenix mission is led by Peter Smith from the University; Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge manages the project. The Phoenix team has been working on a Martian clock since the lander?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander?s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | May 27, 2010
Over the next few months, NASA scientists will begin to analyze information gathered by the Phoenix Mars Lander, whose mission ended earlier this week after repeated unsuccessful attempts to communicate with the craft. The announcement comes two years after the Phoenix Mars Lander touched down on the Red Planet. The mission began on May 25, 2008, and lasted five months — two months beyond its operating expectancy, scientists said. "It did its job better than expected," said Dr. Deborah Bass, deputy project scientist for the Phoenix Mission.
NEWS
December 1, 2005
Every parent knows how special the one-year birthday is of their progeny. They remember the sleepless nights worrying about the health of their babies and if they are safe, and the constant amazement of the knowledge one year can bring. JPL scientist are like all parents as they celebrate the one Martian year birthday of their rovers Spirit and Opportunity. "Spirit was a year old on November 20. Opportunity will be a year old on December 12," said John Callas, deputy project manager of Mars Exploration Rover Project.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | May 25, 2011
JPL scientists announced this week that they have given up attempts to regain contact with the Mars rover Spirit, which powered down in March 2010 after becoming stuck in loose soil on the southern hemisphere of the Red Planet. The last of more than 1,300 unanswered command signals hoped to reawaken Spirit was sent into space at 12:04 a.m. Wednesday, said JPL Mars Exploration Rovers Project Manager John Callas. Many factors went into the decision to end Spirit’s mission, including the need to preserve Mars relay orbiters in top condition for November’s anticipated launch of the new rover Curiosity, a plummeting probability for success, and the fact that “even if we heard from her today, there would so little energy, we couldn’t do the science objectives we wanted to do,” he said.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | July 5, 2007
As the Fourth of July holiday winds down, and Americans head home and back to the office, one of the NASA Martian rovers managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory will continue the spirit of independence with a journey of its own. The rover, called "Opportunity," is scheduled to begin its descent into the massive Mars crater, Victoria, after July 13. In a press conference Thursday, June 28, NASA/JPL announced that the decision to take the aging...
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 13, 2008
This has been a difficult week Martian week, with one Jet Propulsion Laboratory mission ending a few weeks earlier than expected and a longtime rover on the brink of power failure. On Tuesday, JPL announced that the Mars rover named Spirit was running out of power due to a regional dust storm that hit the area hard and fast. “The last communications with Spirit was over the weekend,” said John Callas, Mars Exploration Rover project manager. “On Monday we sent commands to the rover not to talk to us until Thursday.
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NEWS
July 3, 2008
After scientists and engineers deliver a sample of Martian ice scraping to the Phoenix lander?s optical microscope today, they will take a break and enjoy the Fourth of July weekend. ?The science team will stand down,? said Sara Hammond, public affairs manager at University of Arizona. The Phoenix mission is led by Peter Smith from the University; Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge manages the project. The Phoenix team has been working on a Martian clock since the lander?
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 12, 2008
After a few days of vibrating clumpy Martian soil in an attempt to get a sample into the Phoenix lander?s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the material is finally in the oven. The Phoenix is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada and scientists there cheered this week when they heard the sample, after an unexpected delay, had been successfully collected. The TEGA is an instrument that will study substances converted to gases by heating soil samples that are delivered by the robotic arm. Scientists knew that if all went according to plan, the arm would scoop up Martian soil and drop it onto a screen that covers one of the eight ovens on Phoenix.
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