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By Mary O’Keefe | July 23, 2009
Forty years ago this past Monday, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong took that unforgettable step onto the moon as the world watched. While Armstrong?s boot may have been the first to land on the lunar surface, to get to that point, it took hundreds of dedicated scientists and engineers who received only a collective share of the spotlight. Some of those technocrats were at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, which had sent robotic explorers long before Armstrong, Edwin ?
NEWS
February 3, 2005
Guest Column by Preston MacDougall For their classic 1973 album, the psychedelic rock band, Pink Floyd got the optics right, but the astronomy wrong. White light is dispersed into a rainbow of colors by a glass prism, but there is no "Dark Side of the Moon." Perhaps they were referring to the far side of Luna (the name of our moon). Until 1959, when Luna 3, an unmanned Russian spacecraft, rounded the permanent lunar horizon, this half of the lunar surface had never been seen.
NEWS
By Jake Armstrong | January 20, 2005
Scientists on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean are cheering this week as data from the Huygens probe, which landed on Saturn's largest moon last Friday, begins to reveal answers and opens new queries about the solar system's only moon with an atmosphere. Seven years in the making, the landing on Titan marked the first successful touchdown of a probe on a moon other than Earth's. "We're just ecstatic. I think it's high-fives and hugs all around," said Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Earl Maize, deputy project manager of the Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint venture by NASA and the European and Italian space agencies.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 8, 2007
NASA announced last week that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge will be the lead agency for specific robotic surface mobility efforts related to upcoming lunar exploration. The announcement prompts the beginning of new exploration to Earth’s moon that once again merges science fiction with science reality. Stories that have humans living on a base camp lunar surface are now in the not-so-distant future. NASA’s Constellation Program will have astronauts — along with robotic help — build a lunar outpost where they can conduct long-term exploration of the moon.
FEATURES
By Mary O’Keefe Valley Sun | March 19, 2009
La Cañada High School’s engineering team, Leviathan, faced 60 other teams from as far away as Brazil last weekend at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition in Science and Technology) Los Angeles Regional competition at the Long Beach Arena. In the end, the LCHS team, which has only been in existence for two years, ended the tournament seeded in sixth place with a final round that pitted them against third-place teams. One might think that an arena full of young engineers would have an almost library-like academic atmosphere, where scientists, mathematicians and engineers work diligently on their projects, graphing calculators at the ready.
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 23, 2009
Forty years ago this past Monday, on July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong took that unforgettable step onto the moon as the world watched. While Armstrong?s boot may have been the first to land on the lunar surface, to get to that point, it took hundreds of dedicated scientists and engineers who received only a collective share of the spotlight. Some of those technocrats were at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, which had sent robotic explorers long before Armstrong, Edwin ?
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NEWS
February 3, 2005
Guest Column by Preston MacDougall For their classic 1973 album, the psychedelic rock band, Pink Floyd got the optics right, but the astronomy wrong. White light is dispersed into a rainbow of colors by a glass prism, but there is no "Dark Side of the Moon." Perhaps they were referring to the far side of Luna (the name of our moon). Until 1959, when Luna 3, an unmanned Russian spacecraft, rounded the permanent lunar horizon, this half of the lunar surface had never been seen.
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