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NEWS
April 12, 2007
The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors has approved an environmental clearance for the long-planned project to repair the Arroyo Seco Channel from the Los Angeles River to a debris basin near the Foothill Freeway. According to the report adopted, the $1.5 million project is needed to correct damage in the channel from erosion. According to the flood control district, the damage could allow water to undermine three channel bottom and levees. The proposed work will include replacement of portions of the existing channel and levee panels.
NEWS
May 10, 2007
The Board of Supervisors voted last week to turn over to the city 43 trash excluders built on local catch basins to reduce the amount of debris going to the Los Angeles River. The county spent a total of $130,000 on the project, intended to reduce the flow of debris through catch basins receiving the most trash from hillside runoff. The city of La Cañada Flintridge will be responsible to maintain the devices that are here, at an estimated annual cost of $3,500. The county will receive grant funding from California Integrated Waste Management Board to reimburse the cost of the project.
NEWS
August 16, 2007
Red flag alert issued A red flag alert was issued by the National Weather Service on Monday afternoon and remained in effect through yesterday morning. The alert was issued due to high pressure aloft producing very warm and dry conditions for areas including the Angeles National Forest. Many of the affected locations suffered with single digit relative humidities and gusty winds, furthering concern. According to the service report, the combination of strong winds, low humidity and warm temperatures create “explosive” fire growth potential.
THE818NOW
January 11, 2012
The Angeles National Forest announced today that in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Adventure Pass fees will be waived at trailheads and Forest Service-managed day use sites during the weekend of Jan. 14-16.  “To honor a great champion of civil rights, the normally required National Forest Adventure Pass will be waived this weekend, we are working to ensure as many visitors as possible can experience the numerous recreational opportunities the...
NEWS
January 21, 2010
In November 1933, the Pickens Canyon Fire tore through 7,000 acres in the San Gabriel Mountains. Sound familiar? On Jan. 1, 1934, after a week of constant, heavy rain, a flash flood roared down Pickens Canyon, through parts of present-day La Cañada, La Crescenta and Montrose. Unlike our mudflows this week, back in 1934, the walls of water were 20-feet high. The debris pushed down into the town of Montrose. Giant boulders crashed into houses. Hundreds of people went missing. Their bodies were never found.
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | February 28, 2008
Pasadena has officially bought into the local supporters of a federal study of the future of the Arroyo Seco, joining La Cañada Flintridge and two other cities in providing local matching funds. Pasadena?s share of the funding will be $312,700 in cash and in-kind contributions. The city of Los Angeles will make the second largest contribution among cities, $272,109. County share is $534,798; La Cañada Flintridge, $99,650; and South Pasadena, $51,745. An in-kind contribution of $70,000 will come from the Raymond Basin Authority.
NEWS
By Alice Hall-Partyka | November 20, 2008
Because water quality will be a defining issue of my generation, I focused my Girl Scout Gold Award project on the water quality of the stream stretching from Cherry Canyon to Hahamongna Park. As a Girl Scout in Troop 989, I tested for six different pollutants and spent many days throughout the year slogging out debris in this stream It’s hard to imagine that in our beautiful La Cañada foothills, trash and other pollutants lurk in the streams. The trash that people have carelessly tossed aside shares the same water as ducks, frog, fish and a rich variety of other species.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 2, 2007
On Wednesday the fire danger level on the Angeles National Forest in La Cañada's backyard was raised from "very high" to "extreme." This is the highest national level, but the fifth in a six-level program for Angeles National Forest, with the highest being "critical." The decision to move to the extreme level is based upon several variables including the amount of vegetation, fire resources and moisture. "It is not just determined by moisture," said Sherry Rollman, spokeswoman for USDA Forest Service.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | April 10, 2010
Crouching on a charred slope in the Angeles National Forest, La Cañada Flintridge resident John Schiller carefully packed soil around a 6-inch green sapling. It will serve as a replacement for one of the millions of trees burned in the Station fire last August. “I think if [the forest is] all of ours to enjoy, it’s all of ours to take care,” Schiller said. Schiller and his wife, Karin, were among the three dozen volunteers who spent Saturday working alongside representatives of the U.S. Forest Service and Tree People, a forest conservation group, planting young Coulter and Ponderosa pines.
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NEWS
May 10, 2007
The Board of Supervisors voted last week to turn over to the city 43 trash excluders built on local catch basins to reduce the amount of debris going to the Los Angeles River. The county spent a total of $130,000 on the project, intended to reduce the flow of debris through catch basins receiving the most trash from hillside runoff. The city of La Cañada Flintridge will be responsible to maintain the devices that are here, at an estimated annual cost of $3,500. The county will receive grant funding from California Integrated Waste Management Board to reimburse the cost of the project.
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NEWS
April 12, 2007
The Los Angeles Board of Supervisors has approved an environmental clearance for the long-planned project to repair the Arroyo Seco Channel from the Los Angeles River to a debris basin near the Foothill Freeway. According to the report adopted, the $1.5 million project is needed to correct damage in the channel from erosion. According to the flood control district, the damage could allow water to undermine three channel bottom and levees. The proposed work will include replacement of portions of the existing channel and levee panels.
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