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By Mary O’Keefe | December 18, 2008
In less than one second, the La Cañada High School engineering geniuses known as the Axis of Assume won another first place trophy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Invention Challenge. The event took place on Friday at JPL where would-be and actual engineers took the challenge of combining their imagination with engineering skills to come up with an ?aerial car.? For the past five years boys from La Cañada High took part in meeting whatever JPL challenge was given. This year, Douglas Chen, Chris Omae, Tomas and Alex Kanholm and Grant Scholler not only met the challenge, but also won the competition.
NEWS
By Preston MacDougall | March 29, 2007
Necessity is the mother of invention. But, I think this mainly applies to unplanned pregnancies. On numerous historic occasions, the mother of expected inventions is creative laziness. Consider, for example, the confession of John W. Backus, the father of the FORTRAN computer language, who just recently died after a long, productive career with IBM. In a retrospective article, referring to Cold War defense contract research in the 1950s, Backus said "Much of my own work has come from being lazy.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | December 7, 2006
This was the third time La Cañada High sophomores Tomas Kanholm, Grant Scoller, Chris Omae, Douglas Chen and Alex Kanholm entered the Invention Challenge at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and their third time they brought home the first place trophy. "It is very exciting to know these kids did this," said LCHS Principal Damon Dragos. Although the students had strong support from their parents it really was the kids who did the work, he added. The contest was established nine years ago as a challenging yet friendly competition open to students from middle and high schools, JPL employees and contractors and their family members.
NEWS
By Sara Cardine | December 17, 2009
Every year engineer Paul MacNeal makes a round of calls to drum up sponsorship for the “JPL Invention Challenge,” a one-day competition he created in 1998 that pits area middle and high school students against the lab’s engineers to find the best, most efficient invention to perform a pre-determined task. And every year, the big dogs pull through — Boeing, Lockheed Martin and even the U.S. Navy and Marines allot portions of their educational outreach budgets to steer math- and science-minded students down paths to engineering careers.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | December 8, 2005
As a wheel of neon green cups spins, a hypnotic swirl of color begins a process of sand sifting through a bottle then a wooden match strikes and five La Cañada High School students take a collective sigh of relief. Not only has their invention worked perfectly, but for the second year in a row they have won first place in JPL's Invention Challenge. "Wow that was a fun one," said announcer and fellow JPLer Randii Wessen after the LCHS machine struck its match. The eighth annual Invention Challenge was started by JPL employee Paul Mac Neal.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
The Jet Propulsion Laboratories has announced the commencement of its seventh Annual Invention Challenge. The contest is entitled the Bowling Ball Drop Contest. Entrants have to build a contraption that will transfer a bowling ball from a tall platform into a pan. The pan rests on four springs. The ball has to be placed into the pan so that the egg does not break. The device that can perform this action most quickly is the winner. The time will be measured to the nearest 0.01 seconds.
NEWS
December 9, 2004
by Jacqueline Chen In the end, it was not age that mattered as five students from La Cañada High School's 7/8 program walked away with the biggest prize in the high school division of the annual JPL invention competition, held at the laboratory's entrance quadrangle last Friday. The middle schoolers snatched the trophy away from many older, more experienced contestants, including Pasadena's prestigious Polytechnic School. Paul MacNeal, who started organizing the event seven years ago, said that this year's challenge was to design a piece of equipment that would drop a bowling ball from a height of about 5 feet into a pan about 2 to 3 inches from the ground without breaking an egg placed under it. A total of 35 teams participated, including 27 from various Southland high schools, and eight from JPL. The devices they created ranged from complicated robotics enhanced mechanisms to simple fabric tubes, taking anywhere from .73 to 4.7 seconds to complete the drop.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2006
Tupperware, Frisbees, hydraulic turbines, shopping carts, tennis racquets, snowboards, sewing machines, outboard motors, aircraft, even brassieres -- they all began as a creative concept in an inventor's mind that had to be refined, designed, produced, and distributed. American inventiveness has literally changed our world. Doodles, Drafts, and Designs: Industrial Drawings from the Smithsonian, spotlights two centuries of American ingenuity and industry, from inventor's hand to investor's boardroom, from patent office to factory floor.
FEATURES
By Michael J. Arvizu | May 13, 2010
Across from me is Roberta Medford. We’re sitting in front of an open window at her Montrose residence. “What is it about atheists that people just don’t like?” I ask. “You would have to ask them that. I don’t know!” Medford says with a good-natured laugh. I visited Medford on Monday evening to get her take on another vandalization of the Adopt-A-Highway Atheists United sign on the Glendale (2) Freeway. This time, the sign on the southbound side had been defaced.
FEATURES
November 15, 2007
Local Y groups seek donations for troops Members of the Crescenta-Cañada YMCA’s teen leadership program PILOTS and Senior programming join together to salute U.S. military troops with donations to care packages provided by Operation Gratitude. Items can be dropped off at special boxes set up at the CC-YMCA, 1930 Foothill Blvd., La Cañada, through Dec. 7. For suggested items, visit www.opgratitude.com or see the complete listing at the YMCA.   Five Acres calls for Thanksgiving food Five Acres, the 119-year-old therapeutic prevention, treatment and education center in Altadena for abused, neglected and at-risk children, urgently needs food donations for Thanksgiving baskets it will provide children and families in the Altadena/Pasadena area and the San Gabriel Valley.
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NEWS
By Sara Cardine | December 17, 2009
Every year engineer Paul MacNeal makes a round of calls to drum up sponsorship for the “JPL Invention Challenge,” a one-day competition he created in 1998 that pits area middle and high school students against the lab’s engineers to find the best, most efficient invention to perform a pre-determined task. And every year, the big dogs pull through — Boeing, Lockheed Martin and even the U.S. Navy and Marines allot portions of their educational outreach budgets to steer math- and science-minded students down paths to engineering careers.
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | December 18, 2008
In less than one second, the La Cañada High School engineering geniuses known as the Axis of Assume won another first place trophy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Invention Challenge. The event took place on Friday at JPL where would-be and actual engineers took the challenge of combining their imagination with engineering skills to come up with an ?aerial car.? For the past five years boys from La Cañada High took part in meeting whatever JPL challenge was given. This year, Douglas Chen, Chris Omae, Tomas and Alex Kanholm and Grant Scholler not only met the challenge, but also won the competition.
NEWS
By Preston MacDougall | March 29, 2007
Necessity is the mother of invention. But, I think this mainly applies to unplanned pregnancies. On numerous historic occasions, the mother of expected inventions is creative laziness. Consider, for example, the confession of John W. Backus, the father of the FORTRAN computer language, who just recently died after a long, productive career with IBM. In a retrospective article, referring to Cold War defense contract research in the 1950s, Backus said "Much of my own work has come from being lazy.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | December 7, 2006
This was the third time La Cañada High sophomores Tomas Kanholm, Grant Scoller, Chris Omae, Douglas Chen and Alex Kanholm entered the Invention Challenge at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and their third time they brought home the first place trophy. "It is very exciting to know these kids did this," said LCHS Principal Damon Dragos. Although the students had strong support from their parents it really was the kids who did the work, he added. The contest was established nine years ago as a challenging yet friendly competition open to students from middle and high schools, JPL employees and contractors and their family members.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2006
Tupperware, Frisbees, hydraulic turbines, shopping carts, tennis racquets, snowboards, sewing machines, outboard motors, aircraft, even brassieres -- they all began as a creative concept in an inventor's mind that had to be refined, designed, produced, and distributed. American inventiveness has literally changed our world. Doodles, Drafts, and Designs: Industrial Drawings from the Smithsonian, spotlights two centuries of American ingenuity and industry, from inventor's hand to investor's boardroom, from patent office to factory floor.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | December 8, 2005
As a wheel of neon green cups spins, a hypnotic swirl of color begins a process of sand sifting through a bottle then a wooden match strikes and five La Cañada High School students take a collective sigh of relief. Not only has their invention worked perfectly, but for the second year in a row they have won first place in JPL's Invention Challenge. "Wow that was a fun one," said announcer and fellow JPLer Randii Wessen after the LCHS machine struck its match. The eighth annual Invention Challenge was started by JPL employee Paul Mac Neal.
NEWS
December 9, 2004
by Jacqueline Chen In the end, it was not age that mattered as five students from La Cañada High School's 7/8 program walked away with the biggest prize in the high school division of the annual JPL invention competition, held at the laboratory's entrance quadrangle last Friday. The middle schoolers snatched the trophy away from many older, more experienced contestants, including Pasadena's prestigious Polytechnic School. Paul MacNeal, who started organizing the event seven years ago, said that this year's challenge was to design a piece of equipment that would drop a bowling ball from a height of about 5 feet into a pan about 2 to 3 inches from the ground without breaking an egg placed under it. A total of 35 teams participated, including 27 from various Southland high schools, and eight from JPL. The devices they created ranged from complicated robotics enhanced mechanisms to simple fabric tubes, taking anywhere from .73 to 4.7 seconds to complete the drop.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
The Jet Propulsion Laboratories has announced the commencement of its seventh Annual Invention Challenge. The contest is entitled the Bowling Ball Drop Contest. Entrants have to build a contraption that will transfer a bowling ball from a tall platform into a pan. The pan rests on four springs. The ball has to be placed into the pan so that the egg does not break. The device that can perform this action most quickly is the winner. The time will be measured to the nearest 0.01 seconds.
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