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By Susan Stefun | February 19, 2009
Dozens of Rosemont Middle School students crowded around two Chevy Equinox Fuel Cells on display in the school?s amphitheater before classes began last Thursday. Scott Brierley, with General Motors Co. Field Service and Support was on hand to answer questions regarding the company?s hydrogen powered vehicle at the Rosemont campus, which serves families living in the westernmost section of La Cañada Flintridge. Rosemont eighth grader Kelii Jimenez said, ?It looked like a normal car.?
NEWS
April 14, 2005
Guest Column by PRESTON MACDOUGALL "Are we there yet?" If my family and I were on one of our numerous cross-country treks, such a question would normally come from somewhere in the back. Lately, however, it is more likely to come from the bookkeeper in the family, seated in the front passenger seat. And the setting isn't likely to be a jam-packed interstate, but rather a local gas station, as I, the chauffeur in the family, pump away. Meanwhile, the numbered wheels in the "THIS SALE" window are spinning at rpm's that I normally associate with a one-armed bandit in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Sara Cardine | December 14, 2009
After more than 10 years of planning and preparation, and a few last-minute delays, Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientists launched Monday an infrared telescope designed to map the entire sky using infrared light. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope will spend the next nine months photographing images in long-wavelength infrared light, at the rate of one image every 11 seconds, sending millions of images back to earth for analysis. Mission team members hope to create a “road map” of the universe, including near-Earth asteroids, old and dying stars, planet-forming disks and distant galaxies.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | January 11, 2007
At a recent meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle, Wash., a geology professor at Washington State University, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, presented his theory that the JPL-managed Viking space probes of 1976-77 may have found alien microbes on Mars and inadvertently killed them. Schulze-Makuch contends that Viking was looking for Earth-like life, in which salt water is the internal liquid of living cells. However with the cold dry conditions of Mars, life could have evolved with the key internal fluid consisting of a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide-based life peroxide.
NEWS
By Preston MacDougall | November 23, 2006
Ribosomes may make my bones, but words are just as much "me." Steven Pinker's fascinating book, The Language Instinct, didn't say it in so many words, but I think this aphorism succinctly expresses his expert perspective on "how the mind creates language." First published in 1994, by William Morrow and Co., when Pinker was a professor of brain and cognitive science at MIT, this absorbing book is now in print as a Perrennial Classic from HarperCollins Publishers. Pinker himself is now at Harvard.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | April 4, 2012
Several budding scientists from La Cañada Flintridge and La Crescenta stood out from the crowd of 1,100 participants in the Los Angeles County Science Fair last weekend at the Pasadena Convention Center. Christopher Sercel, a St. Francis High School junior, earned the competition's Earthwatch Award in ecology for his project, “A Toasty Worm is a Happy Worm: A Study of the Effect of Temperature On the Metabolic Rate of Mealworms.” Sercel earned the right to participate in an international expedition with working environmental scientists studying topics such as sea turtles, endangered zebras or migrating gray whales.
NEWS
February 22, 2007
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has captured for the first time enough light from planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets, to identify signatures of molecules in their atmospheres. The landmark achievement, announced by JPL on Wednesday, is a significant step toward being able to detect possible life on rocky exoplanets and comes years before astronomers had anticipated. "This is an amazing surprise," said Spitzer project scientist Dr. Michael Werner of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Implicit in the saying ?We?ll cross that bridge when we come to it,? is the assumption that the bridge will still be there if we can?t find a way to avoid it. With all the press coverage after the deadly tragedy of the unexpected collapse of the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, people are getting a glimpse into the paradox that quantum theorists refer to as Schrödinger?s cat. Imagine a cat in an electrically-shielded, soundproof box, along with glass vial of hydrogen cyanide that has a hammer and sickle poised above it. The sickle is irrelevant, but the hammer is held in position by a latch that will release if it receives a radio signal from a Geiger counter that is also inside the box. The Geiger counter will send a signal whenever it is bombarded by the energetic alpha particles that will result from the nuclear disintegration of the polonium-210 atoms in the cat?
NEWS
February 3, 2005
Guest Column by Preston MacDougall For their classic 1973 album, the psychedelic rock band, Pink Floyd got the optics right, but the astronomy wrong. White light is dispersed into a rainbow of colors by a glass prism, but there is no "Dark Side of the Moon." Perhaps they were referring to the far side of Luna (the name of our moon). Until 1959, when Luna 3, an unmanned Russian spacecraft, rounded the permanent lunar horizon, this half of the lunar surface had never been seen.
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NEWS
By Susan Stefun | February 19, 2009
Dozens of Rosemont Middle School students crowded around two Chevy Equinox Fuel Cells on display in the school?s amphitheater before classes began last Thursday. Scott Brierley, with General Motors Co. Field Service and Support was on hand to answer questions regarding the company?s hydrogen powered vehicle at the Rosemont campus, which serves families living in the westernmost section of La Cañada Flintridge. Rosemont eighth grader Kelii Jimenez said, ?It looked like a normal car.?
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NEWS
April 14, 2005
Guest Column by PRESTON MACDOUGALL "Are we there yet?" If my family and I were on one of our numerous cross-country treks, such a question would normally come from somewhere in the back. Lately, however, it is more likely to come from the bookkeeper in the family, seated in the front passenger seat. And the setting isn't likely to be a jam-packed interstate, but rather a local gas station, as I, the chauffeur in the family, pump away. Meanwhile, the numbered wheels in the "THIS SALE" window are spinning at rpm's that I normally associate with a one-armed bandit in Las Vegas.
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