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By Mary O'Keefe | April 19, 2007
The search of life beyond Earth has filled the imagination of humans for centuries. The question of "Are we alone?" has inspired science fiction writers and scientists. The problem has been how to see those Earth-like planets that are so distant. It has been a Catch 22 situation: To find a twin to planet Earth it must be close to a twin Sun, however proximity to such a bright object blurs the vision of telescopes. That is until recently, when two JPL researchers began working a new type of telescope.
FEATURES
March 18, 2010
Gallagher to present Tupper Awards in May David Gallagher , deputy director of the Astronomy and Physics Directorate at JPL, will present the annual Les Tupper Community Service Awards on Monday, May 10, in JPL?s von Karman Auditorium. All residents are invited to this annual event sponsored by the La Cañada Flintridge Coordinating Council . Gallagher will also provide an overview of JPL and the projects within the Astronomy and Physics Directorate Prior to his current assignment, Gallagher was project manager for the Space Interferometry Mission, a future program to study planets around other stars using two smaller separated telescopes in space to achieve the capability of a very large diameter telescope.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 14, 2009
Astronauts from the space shuttle Atlantis have arrived at Hubble Space Telescope, orbiting about 350 miles above Earth, for the fifth and final trip to make repairs to the craft. Upon their return, the astronauts will have the Jet Propulsion Laboratory camera that has been responsible for so many of the telescope’s historic photos. The shuttle reached the telescope on Wednesday, when astronauts grabbed the telescope to begin making several repairs. Karl Stapelfeldt, principal scientist in the Astrophysics section at JPL, said today would be a “big day,” referring to astronauts removing the JPL camera from the Hubble.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 20, 2008
Last week NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that the Hubble Space Telescope the first visible-light picture of a planet outside our solar system. Karl Stapelfeldt, one of the co-authors for the Hubble Telescope Planet Detection program at JPL/Caltech and a La Crescenta resident, said that the detection of planets such as the one photographed is very difficult. “Everyone would like to see an image but it is very hard to see,” Stapelfeldt said. “The planet is very faint and very bright.
NEWS
December 30, 2004
Guest Column by Preston MacDougall In a galaxy far, far away, one of the building blocks of proteins, an amino acid, was synthesized in a chemical reaction that occurred a long, long time ago. This is not the very, very beginning of the Star Wars fantasy. Rather, it is a typical conclusion that astrochemists might reach after studying data collected, and relayed back to Earth, by the Hubble Space Telescope. This eye in the sky is affectionately referred to simply as "Hubble," after the American boxer, Rhodes Scholar, and finally astronomer who, in 1929, the year the Stock Market crashed, had the nerve to claim that the entire universe was expanding!
NEWS
By Sara Cardine, Special to the Valley Sun | August 10, 2011
At JPL, there is no shortage of doctorates and intellectual pedigrees among the facility's 5,000 employees. But what is rare, anyone there can tell you, is a truly good manager. Enter David Gallagher, a La Cañada resident recently appointed by JPL to head the directorate of Astronomy, Physics and Space Technology, one of five operational divisions. Gallagher is modest about his high-ranking position, indicating with a chuckle that he's come all this way on “just” a bachelor's degree in engineering from Purdue University and his ability to organize diverse groups of people.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
On the Lighter Side By Steve Browne, Official JPL Neighbor Using sophisticated computer programs and satellite imaging, experts have identified a dangerous but small black hole of intelligence near Hahamongna Park. The exact location of this anomaly is at the entrance of La Cañada High School near the administration office. Apparently parents who are dropping their children are affected the most by this mysterious force that renders drivers incapable of thinking. The most apparent symptom is a driver's inability to pull forward and let other people enter the parking lot. The affected drivers just stop and can only talk to their children and let them out. Students are also affected and can be seen walking in the parking lot oblivious to the cars driving around them, although some attribute this behavior to just being a teenager.
NEWS
December 8, 2005
NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is bringing new light -- infrared light -- to the study of our dark and mysterious universe. Some of the observatory's most exciting discoveries will be discussed in free public lectures today, Dec. 8. and tomorrow, Dec. 9. Michael Werner, project scientist for Spitzer at JPL, will present, "The Spitzer Space Telescope: Exploring the Infrared Universe," at 7 p.m. both days. Today's lecture will be at JPL, while tomorrow's event will be at Pasadena City College's Vosloh Forum.
NEWS
May 13, 2010
JPL’s open house is Saturday, Sunday “Worlds Beyond” is the theme of this year’s open house event at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Admission and parking are free. One item on display will be the JPL-built Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, retrieved from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope last year by astronauts and on loan from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum. JPL is located at 4800 Oak Grove Drive, La Cañada.
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FEATURES
March 18, 2010
Gallagher to present Tupper Awards in May David Gallagher , deputy director of the Astronomy and Physics Directorate at JPL, will present the annual Les Tupper Community Service Awards on Monday, May 10, in JPL?s von Karman Auditorium. All residents are invited to this annual event sponsored by the La Cañada Flintridge Coordinating Council . Gallagher will also provide an overview of JPL and the projects within the Astronomy and Physics Directorate Prior to his current assignment, Gallagher was project manager for the Space Interferometry Mission, a future program to study planets around other stars using two smaller separated telescopes in space to achieve the capability of a very large diameter telescope.
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NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | May 14, 2009
Astronauts from the space shuttle Atlantis have arrived at Hubble Space Telescope, orbiting about 350 miles above Earth, for the fifth and final trip to make repairs to the craft. Upon their return, the astronauts will have the Jet Propulsion Laboratory camera that has been responsible for so many of the telescope’s historic photos. The shuttle reached the telescope on Wednesday, when astronauts grabbed the telescope to begin making several repairs. Karl Stapelfeldt, principal scientist in the Astrophysics section at JPL, said today would be a “big day,” referring to astronauts removing the JPL camera from the Hubble.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 20, 2008
Last week NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that the Hubble Space Telescope the first visible-light picture of a planet outside our solar system. Karl Stapelfeldt, one of the co-authors for the Hubble Telescope Planet Detection program at JPL/Caltech and a La Crescenta resident, said that the detection of planets such as the one photographed is very difficult. “Everyone would like to see an image but it is very hard to see,” Stapelfeldt said. “The planet is very faint and very bright.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | April 19, 2007
The search of life beyond Earth has filled the imagination of humans for centuries. The question of "Are we alone?" has inspired science fiction writers and scientists. The problem has been how to see those Earth-like planets that are so distant. It has been a Catch 22 situation: To find a twin to planet Earth it must be close to a twin Sun, however proximity to such a bright object blurs the vision of telescopes. That is until recently, when two JPL researchers began working a new type of telescope.
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