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Heat Exhaustion

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NEWS
August 7, 2008
Q. I feel that the heat affects me more now than when I was younger. Are there extra precautions I should take? ? Emma, La Crescenta ? Our bodies don?t adjust to high temperatures as well when we get older so we do need to be careful. We need to drink lots of fluids even when we don?t feel thirsty. We need to avoid caffeine, alcohol and soda, which can all lead to dehydration. It is a good idea to ask the pharmacist if any of our medications will make us more sensitive to heat and/or sun. Many of them do. We should try to stay in air-conditioned places and avoid going outside in the heat of the day. You have probably heard that you absorb Vitamin D from sunshine.
NEWS
July 14, 2010
Q. I feel that the heat affects me more now than when I was younger. Are there extra precautions I should take? Emma, La Crescenta   When we are in the heat too long, we can experience heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. The symptoms of heat exhaustion are dizziness, headache and muscle cramps. The symptoms of heat stroke are difficulty breathing, hot or flushed skin and confusion. In both cases the body needs to be physically cooled down by a cool sponge bath or immersion in a tub of cool water, and medical attention should be sought.
NEWS
By Geghard Arakelian | September 1, 2005
Hot temperatures in the valley give rise to different alternatives for conserving water and forces athletic directors to change training routines. Due to the drought, those looking to preserve water can buy a watering calculator to prevent the usage of unnecessary water, said Christy Scott, spokeswoman for Crescenta Valley Water District. A water calculator measures temperatures, weather forecasts and does it all with satellite technology. Among other alternatives to saving water, when temperatures hit above 90 degrees, are lawn rebates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Turney | June 28, 2011
Q. With the current 90 plus temperatures, what do I need to know about safety in the heat of summer? As we get older, our risk for developing heat-related illness increases because our body's ability to adequately respond to summer heat can become less efficient. Hyperthermia is the name given to a variety of heat-related illnesses that can include heat stroke, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat), heat cramps and heat exhaustion. A person's risk for hyperthermia is based not only on the outside temperature; it includes the general health and lifestyle of the individual.
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NEWS
July 14, 2010
Q. I feel that the heat affects me more now than when I was younger. Are there extra precautions I should take? Emma, La Crescenta   When we are in the heat too long, we can experience heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. The symptoms of heat exhaustion are dizziness, headache and muscle cramps. The symptoms of heat stroke are difficulty breathing, hot or flushed skin and confusion. In both cases the body needs to be physically cooled down by a cool sponge bath or immersion in a tub of cool water, and medical attention should be sought.
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FEATURES
July 9, 2009
Since we have been talking about safety the last two weeks, I would like to continue that theme by discussing safety in the heat of summer. Hyperthermia is the name given to a variety of heat-related illnesses that can include heat stroke, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat), heat cramps and heat exhaustion. As we get older, our risk for developing heat-related illness increases because our body?s ability to adequately respond to summer heat can become less efficient.
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