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By Carol Cormaci, carol.cormaci@latimes.com | April 9, 2014
A large envelope addressed to me in cursive handwriting was delivered to our home mailbox last week. A quick glance at the return address suggested I was in for a special treat. La Cañada Elementary School teacher Sue Fuelling had earlier alerted me via email that she hoped to soon send through the postal service some thank-you notes her class had written me after my participation in the school's late February community read-in. I opened the envelope eagerly, then leafed through the 29 well-crafted and thoughtful notes, savoring the children's words and reliving our brief time together.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CARY ORDWAY | August 6, 2009
Just northeast of California?s Gold Country, the roadways heading toward Lake Tahoe reveal a wonderland of outdoor scenery and recreational opportunities. Closed to cross-mountain travel in winter, Highway 4 opens in summer to connect with Highway 89. This route will take you from Angel?s Camp through the charming town of Murphys, right by Calaveras Big Trees State Park, the recreation-oriented town of Arnold and then up through heavily wooded mountain areas where you?ll find Bear Valley Ski Area, Markleeville and then another world of recreational possibilities in Hope Valley.
NEWS
By Chris Sutton | April 28, 2005
Wide eyed fourth graders at Paradise Canyon Elementary School were not tricked by the fool's gold shown to them by Lotta Crabtree, known in the Gold Rush era as the California Diamond and the darling of the Old West, played by actress and storyteller Judith Helton in her performance last week. Playing a banjo, tambourine and drum, through songs and dance she captured the life of the miners in the California gold fields after 1848 and traced Crabtree's career as a child performer, beginning at age 7, as she traveled to various camps and towns with her mother.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | October 26, 2011
This story is true. Or not. At right about the time of the California Gold Rush, around 1849, a young man named Joaquin Murieta and his pretty wife Rosita traveled north from Mexico, to the California mining camps to mine for gold. The threads of Murieta's true history have unraveled over time. In 1854, John R. Ridge published a book describing how the other miners were so prejudiced against Joaquin Murieta that they assaulted and killed Rosita, which caused Murieta to swear revenge.
NEWS
April 5, 2007
Ted Ashby , a history buff from Eagle Rock Kiwanis, made a well-received presentation to the Kiwanis-AM group on the forming and operation of the Pony Express. When the Gold Rush hit California in 1849, California was quickly made into a state to make sure the gold did not end up in the wrong hands, Ashby said. The total population on the West Coast was only 500,000, and it could take weeks for news from the East to reach them by stagecoach. With Civil War threatening, Californians were eager to know what was going on, and people in the East wanted to know if they should drop everything and head West where the streets were paved with gold.
NEWS
May 17, 2007
Ten Years Ago ? Rich Wheeler was introduced during a meeting of the La Cañada Unified School District Governing Board as the new head football coach at La Cañada High. Twenty Years Ago ? On opening weekend of the fishing season at June Lake City, 9-year-old Sharon Illian of LCF won the award for having caught the "ugliest fish." Thirty Years Ago ? La Cañada High School senior Janet Foley was poised to be crowned queen of La Cañada Flintridge at the Gold Rush Ball to be held in conjunction with Fiesta Days 1977.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
If you're looking for the Wild West, you could do no better than to go to a place that was once the home of Mark Twain and even memorialized in one of his short stories. Lucky for California residents, Calaveras County is a reasonable drive from both north and south and puts a lot of Gold Rush history all within a few square miles. Students of Mark Twain will remember the "Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," a short story that was actually Twain's first published work and what eventually made him famous.
FEATURES
By Bea Abbey | February 16, 2006
The stories of the Old West are priceless gems. The following is a good example, I think. Yes, you may have read it some time ago. We all know that California was an extremely popular state during the Gold Rush days. Ray Reynolds of "California the Curious" did his research well. Some 250 express companies operated stage coaches between 1849 and 1852. The competition had consequences. The following notice appeared in a San Francisco newspaper in 1852: "Fast riding Mr. William Hamler, riding for Gregory's Express, was reported to have come up Washington Street on Thursday night like a streak of lightning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cary Ordway | May 4, 2006
Just when California river outfitters were anticipating a normal rafting season in 2006, along came Mother Nature to dump copious amounts of snow in March and April. The net result — This year's rafting season is going to be longer and wetter than ever. The 2005 season was unusually long because of the large amount of snowmelt that dramatically increased the flow in many of California's rivers. Now, judging from recent measurements that show nearly twice as much snowmelt as usual, this coming season is expected to be even better.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2004
California Weekend by Cary Ordway is a new feature in Applause designed to help the California resident and visitor find unique and extraordinary getaway experiences in and near California. One never forgets the first time - on a houseboat, that is. It has to be considered one of life's precious moments when you come on board your own 40-foot boat, crank up those growly engines and cast off for parts unknown. It's almost like you want to run up to the front of the boat, position your arms like wings and yell out something like "I'm the king of the?
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NEWS
By Carol Cormaci, carol.cormaci@latimes.com | April 9, 2014
A large envelope addressed to me in cursive handwriting was delivered to our home mailbox last week. A quick glance at the return address suggested I was in for a special treat. La Cañada Elementary School teacher Sue Fuelling had earlier alerted me via email that she hoped to soon send through the postal service some thank-you notes her class had written me after my participation in the school's late February community read-in. I opened the envelope eagerly, then leafed through the 29 well-crafted and thoughtful notes, savoring the children's words and reliving our brief time together.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By CARY ORDWAY | August 6, 2009
Just northeast of California?s Gold Country, the roadways heading toward Lake Tahoe reveal a wonderland of outdoor scenery and recreational opportunities. Closed to cross-mountain travel in winter, Highway 4 opens in summer to connect with Highway 89. This route will take you from Angel?s Camp through the charming town of Murphys, right by Calaveras Big Trees State Park, the recreation-oriented town of Arnold and then up through heavily wooded mountain areas where you?ll find Bear Valley Ski Area, Markleeville and then another world of recreational possibilities in Hope Valley.
NEWS
By Chris Sutton | April 28, 2005
Wide eyed fourth graders at Paradise Canyon Elementary School were not tricked by the fool's gold shown to them by Lotta Crabtree, known in the Gold Rush era as the California Diamond and the darling of the Old West, played by actress and storyteller Judith Helton in her performance last week. Playing a banjo, tambourine and drum, through songs and dance she captured the life of the miners in the California gold fields after 1848 and traced Crabtree's career as a child performer, beginning at age 7, as she traveled to various camps and towns with her mother.
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