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By Anita Susan Brenner | October 8, 2009
Sukkot, or the season of joyous celebrations, began last Friday night and will continue until tomorrow. A “sukkah” is a booth or hut. It is fragile, just like the world is fragile. It is a meant to be a reminder of the 40 years Moses and the Israelites wandered the desert after their liberation from slavery in Egypt. This year, our sukkah has a few bungee cords and a lot of palm fronds, courtesy of a City of Hope doctor named Mark Esensten and the Arboretum. Every year, Mark organizes a palm tree trimming expedition.
FEATURES
By Michael J. Arvizu,Valley Sun | March 20, 2008
Tradition The chilly Palm Sunday morning air does not keep the faithful at St. Bede the Venerable Parish from commemorating Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem. As with most Palm Sunday services, they begin outside, symbolic of the people who gathered to meet and greet Jesus, who by this time had come to be known almost as a celebrity. Most have palm fronds in their hands, symbolic of the palms that adorned the streets of the ancient city as Jesus made his way past the people.
FEATURES
By Michael Arvizu | April 1, 2010
I have always been amazed at the breadth of the services that are available in our area?s churches in the days surrounding Holy Week and preceding Easter, with Easter itself a day chock-full of activities. Looking at last year?s Holy Week and Easter Sunday services list, we had choral passions and baptism by candlelight, presented by St. George?s Episcopal Church; a telling of the Passion story involving the people of the church, presented by La Cañada United Methodist; a self-guided spiritual journey and Easter Sunday services on a hill behind Descanso Gardens presented by La Cañada Presbyterian; and six Masses at St. Bede?
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | October 7, 2010
Sorry, Mel Gibson. I did it. The rain was my fault. Scholars note that prayers for rain are among the earliest liturgical texts and that the Bible regards the withholding of rain as a punishment from God (cf. Deut. 11:11–17; I Kings 17:1). Just as there are four seasons in Southern California (earthquake, wind, mudslides, fire), there are four seasons in Jewish folk tradition. Unlike the secular seasons (fall, winter, spring, summer), all four Jewish seasons are compressed into one month.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | February 22, 2012
Christians crowded into local churches Wednesday, joining their counterparts around the world to mark the start of Lent with the traditional application of ashes to the forehead. The 40-day Lenten season is regarded by Roman Catholics and others as the most sacred time of the year. It culminates with Holy Week and Easter Sunday, recognized as the day of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The ashes, applied to the forehead in the form of a cross by a priest or Eucharistic minister, traditionally come from palm fronds collected on the previous Palm Sunday and then burned.
FEATURES
June 21, 2007
Jane Napier Neely Chit Chat From Here And There ... Today, at precisely 6:06 p.m., is not only the first day of summer, but it is also the longest day of the year north of the equator. It is also referred to as Midsummer because it is roughly the middle of the growing season throughout much of Europe. Many people call this day the Summer Solstice. The word "Solstice" is derived from two Latin words: "sol" meaning sun, and "sistere," to cause to stand still. This is because, as the summer solstice approaches, the noonday sun rises higher and higher in the sky on each successive day. On the day of the solstice, it raises an imperceptible amount, compared to the day before.
NEWS
March 13, 2008
The Call of Lent is the Valley Sun?s Lenten series on the messages of Christ?s death and resurrection as interpreted by area religious leaders. ? This Sunday is Palm Sunday, and the beginning of Holy Week on the Christian calendar, the week before Easter. Special services throughout the week commemorate Jesus? last days on earth, and culminate in celebrating his resurrection. These services are rich in symbolism and meaning; they plumb the depths and soar the heights of the Christian faith.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jane Napier Neely | July 28, 2010
According to the weather people on the various TV stations, we are headed for one of the coolest Julys in recent recorded history. Guess Mother Nature just knew some of us were loving that "June gloom" and just kept giving us extra servings. It was cool enough early Monday morning for me to dig out my fuzzy slippers because my feet were cold — who ever heard of that in July? So, for now I'm quite happy with our overcast mornings. . Even though we have been in the glooms in the a.m., by the time we reach the p.m. the day has warmed up sufficiently to give us balmy nights.
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NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | October 8, 2009
Sukkot, or the season of joyous celebrations, began last Friday night and will continue until tomorrow. A “sukkah” is a booth or hut. It is fragile, just like the world is fragile. It is a meant to be a reminder of the 40 years Moses and the Israelites wandered the desert after their liberation from slavery in Egypt. This year, our sukkah has a few bungee cords and a lot of palm fronds, courtesy of a City of Hope doctor named Mark Esensten and the Arboretum. Every year, Mark organizes a palm tree trimming expedition.
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FEATURES
By Michael J. Arvizu,Valley Sun | March 20, 2008
Tradition The chilly Palm Sunday morning air does not keep the faithful at St. Bede the Venerable Parish from commemorating Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem. As with most Palm Sunday services, they begin outside, symbolic of the people who gathered to meet and greet Jesus, who by this time had come to be known almost as a celebrity. Most have palm fronds in their hands, symbolic of the palms that adorned the streets of the ancient city as Jesus made his way past the people.
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