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By Mary O’Keefe | November 20, 2008
Last week NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that the Hubble Space Telescope the first visible-light picture of a planet outside our solar system. Karl Stapelfeldt, one of the co-authors for the Hubble Telescope Planet Detection program at JPL/Caltech and a La Crescenta resident, said that the detection of planets such as the one photographed is very difficult. “Everyone would like to see an image but it is very hard to see,” Stapelfeldt said. “The planet is very faint and very bright.
NEWS
By Joe Puglia | July 19, 2007
Part three of three We broke camp early but the adventure was far from over. Heading south, we followed the Yellowstone River, then, taking a quick jaunt through Western Wyoming we tacked our ship, pointed it west and followed the Pacific sun. This is my last write chronicling discoveries made on this Montana adventure, a class about Lewis and Clark and surviving on the land. My students' moods are euphoric; they savor the sweetness of knowing that they have matched the mountains.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 10, 2006
Space Shuttle Discovery astronauts made a stop at JPL to discuss their recent mission with scientists, engineers and future astronauts. Mission specialists Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers spoke to a standing room only audience at JPL's von Karman Auditorium last Thursday. The astronauts were part of a six-member Discovery team that was the first space shuttle to launch on Independence Day. They returned to Earth on July 17 after a successful flight. During the mission, Sellers performed three spacewalks.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | January 3, 2008
At Jet Propulsion Laboratory, studying the sun, the moon and the stars are only part of the universe they reached out to during 2007. Each year Cassini continues to explore Saturn and its famous rings. During the past 12 months, exploring the moons of Saturn supplied more data, which answered as many questions of the past while posing new ones for the future. JPL scientists and engineers also made progress on looking for Earth-like planets. The problem of looking for an exoplanet, a planet orbiting a star other than the sun, had been difficult because its dim glow is overpowered by the intense glare of a much brighter parent star.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 26, 2008
On June 15, the Phoenix Mars Lander, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here, used its robotic arm to dig down into a trench called ?Dodo-Goldilocks.? As the arm scooped out soil samples it came upon dice-size clumps of bright, white material. The arm dropped the clumps to the side and scientists watched. Four days later the clumps had disappeared. ?They had been clearing out the trench area and found these few large clods. They looked light and [scientists thought] they could be ice or salt,?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 19, 2008
After 17 years, four times its expected mission lifetime, the Ulysses spacecraft is only a few weeks away from ending its exploration of the sun. According to Ed Smith, Ulysses project scientist at JPL, the main objective of the spacecraft was to study “from every angle, the heliosphere, which is the vast bubble in space carved out by the solar wind.” He credits Ulysses with redefining the knowledge of the heliosphere and “our solar neighborhood.” The spacecraft has flown over the sun’s poles three times.
NEWS
April 29, 2010
La Cañada Flintridge is one tree richer. Mayor Donald Voss was joined by city and county officials Tuesday in marking La Cañada’s 22nd Arbor Day with the planting of a Catalina ironwood tree. The planting, which took place at Mayors’ Discovery Park, is an annual event required in order for the city to maintain its designation as a Tree City USA. “Tree City USA is a national recognition that recognizes cities for their outstanding civil cultural practices,” said Tamara Hanna, a deputy forester with the Los Angeles County Forestry Division.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | October 11, 2007
There?s one more new thing to discover at Mayors? Discovery Park this week. Now, in addition to seeing ceramic sea creature sculptures in the water fountain and digging up a lost city under the sandbox, visitors to the park on Foothill Boulevard can learn the names of each of La Cañada Flintridge?s past 12 mayors, from since the city was incorporated in 1976. Bronze plaques telling the former mayors? names and years of mayoral service to the city were added to a concrete sound wall on the south side of the park, which lies adjacent to the onramp to the Glendale (2)
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COMMUNITY
April 2, 2014
Ten Years Ago A herd of 250 goats arrived by transporter truck that brought them from Lakeview, Ore. to Descanso Gardens to serve in a vegetation management capacity, eating brush to reduce fire fuel. They were in La Cañada for a one-month stay, during which it was expected they would thin out the brush across 13 acres. Twenty Years Ago La Cañada resident Sue Schecter, then serving as president of the Lanterman Historical Museum Foundation, was appointed to the State Historical Resources Commission by Gov. Pete Wilson.
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NEWS
July 11, 2013
La Cañada Flintridge June 30 - July 2 Identity theft: 500 block of Venado Vista Drive. A man reported fraudulent credit card accounts being opened in his name. July 6 Petty theft: 1300 block of Foothill Boulevard, between 9 a.m. and noon. A doctor reported his Apple iPhone 5 was stolen from on top of a desk in his office. July 6 Vehicle burglary: 1830 Foothill Blvd., between 3:30 and 5 p.m. A leather purse, makeup kit, bathing suit, sunglasses case and a vehicle security remote were taken from a sport utility vehicle while it was parked at Mayors' Discovery Park.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | May 25, 2011
JPL scientists announced this week that they have given up attempts to regain contact with the Mars rover Spirit, which powered down in March 2010 after becoming stuck in loose soil on the southern hemisphere of the Red Planet. The last of more than 1,300 unanswered command signals hoped to reawaken Spirit was sent into space at 12:04 a.m. Wednesday, said JPL Mars Exploration Rovers Project Manager John Callas. Many factors went into the decision to end Spirit’s mission, including the need to preserve Mars relay orbiters in top condition for November’s anticipated launch of the new rover Curiosity, a plummeting probability for success, and the fact that “even if we heard from her today, there would so little energy, we couldn’t do the science objectives we wanted to do,” he said.
NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | April 29, 2010
By Thursday night, the online bids were coming fast and furious. The purpose? To support the Adat Ari El Sisterhood Tea and raise money for the synagogue’s school. By then, it was just the three of us: me, my dog Miss Audrey Hepburn and my credit card. Despite such auspicious beginnings, I was not relaxed. In fact, I was frustrated. Frustrated at being outbid (online) for a round of golf at the beautiful El Caballero Country Club with the synagogue president. Frustrated at being outbid (online)
NEWS
April 29, 2010
La Cañada Flintridge is one tree richer. Mayor Donald Voss was joined by city and county officials Tuesday in marking La Cañada’s 22nd Arbor Day with the planting of a Catalina ironwood tree. The planting, which took place at Mayors’ Discovery Park, is an annual event required in order for the city to maintain its designation as a Tree City USA. “Tree City USA is a national recognition that recognizes cities for their outstanding civil cultural practices,” said Tamara Hanna, a deputy forester with the Los Angeles County Forestry Division.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 16, 2009
The mission of the spacecraft Ulysses, which studied the far-flung polar regions of the sun, has come to an end after 18 years of exploration far outlasting its original life expectancy. The spacecraft was a joint mission between Jet Propulsion Laboratory/NASA and European Space Agency. Throughout its long mission it entered unexplored regions of the solar system, gathering information about the sun and its environment. ?We lasted almost four times longer than planned and a year longer than we thought we would,?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | November 20, 2008
Last week NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that the Hubble Space Telescope the first visible-light picture of a planet outside our solar system. Karl Stapelfeldt, one of the co-authors for the Hubble Telescope Planet Detection program at JPL/Caltech and a La Crescenta resident, said that the detection of planets such as the one photographed is very difficult. “Everyone would like to see an image but it is very hard to see,” Stapelfeldt said. “The planet is very faint and very bright.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 26, 2008
On June 15, the Phoenix Mars Lander, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory here, used its robotic arm to dig down into a trench called ?Dodo-Goldilocks.? As the arm scooped out soil samples it came upon dice-size clumps of bright, white material. The arm dropped the clumps to the side and scientists watched. Four days later the clumps had disappeared. ?They had been clearing out the trench area and found these few large clods. They looked light and [scientists thought] they could be ice or salt,?
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | June 19, 2008
After 17 years, four times its expected mission lifetime, the Ulysses spacecraft is only a few weeks away from ending its exploration of the sun. According to Ed Smith, Ulysses project scientist at JPL, the main objective of the spacecraft was to study “from every angle, the heliosphere, which is the vast bubble in space carved out by the solar wind.” He credits Ulysses with redefining the knowledge of the heliosphere and “our solar neighborhood.” The spacecraft has flown over the sun’s poles three times.
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