Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: La Cañada HomeCollectionsConservatives
IN THE NEWS

Conservatives

RELATED KEYWORDS:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 19, 2008
Letters to the Editor Democrats aren’t conservatives When I read the letter by Greta Pruitt (“Standing firm for Russ Warner,” Our Readers Write, June 5) I laughed so loud that my neighbors three houses away probably heard me. I can’t believe she describes the Democrats as “fiscal conservatives.” How naive can she be? Does Ms. Pruitt think socialized medicine is a program based on fiscal conservatism? Democrats ruled the House for 40 years and had a deficit in 36 of those years.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Reporter Jake Armstrong did a fine job in boiling down the complex subject of water rates ("Wholesale Water Rate Change to be Considered") in the Sun two weeks ago. In reporting the rate Foothill Municipal Water District (FMWD) pays to Metropolitan Water District (MWD), however, I provided him with the rates for both treated and untreated water. Since FMWD purchases only treated water from MWD, the rate we pay is the $326 reported PLUS a $92 treatment surcharge for a total of $418 an acre-foot.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
A terrific organization is having a positive impact on the foothills from La Crescenta to Altadena. Founded in 2000, the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy has preserved natural areas, planned regional trail systems and educated residents about issues pertaining to local history and open space. Recently, the Arroyos and Foothills Conservancy (AFC) successfully secured funding to purchase, preserve and maintain land in La Crescenta. The 7.75-acre property is located atop Rosemont Avenue.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In regard to Megan O'Neil's article, “Trust eyes foothill parcel” (Jan. 19), thank you, thank you to the Whalin family and the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy for working together to help preserve a small piece of the beautiful and wild hillsides that so define La Crescenta. It fills my heart to know that the cry of the red-tail hawks, the perfume of the sage bushes, the cool shade of the oaks, and the deer and coyote habitat will be around for my children and grandchildren to enjoy as much as I do. I have known the Arroyos and Foothills Conservancy for many years, and have seen the work it has done in stewarding similar property in the foothills above Altadena.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
Conservation may not be the solution to California’s water problem, but it is an important part of a multi-faceted approach to solving our state’s water needs. Drought is normal for California. Thirty-seven of the last 40 centuries have been dry (“Water in California,” by David Carle). The 20th century was one of the three wet centuries; California’s growth was predicated on the expectation of an uncharacteristic amount of water. As much as 70% of residential water use is for landscaping.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | April 6, 2011
Local water agencies give credit to wet weather and genuine conservation efforts by many La Cañada Flintridge residents for significantly reducing water usage throughout the city during a recent 10-day cutoff of imported water supply. The temporary closure of a Metropolitan Water District treatment plant for repairs prompted a voluntary ban on outdoor watering from March 18 to March 28. During that time, demand for water fell 20% to 30% throughout the city — meaning a lot of residents did refrain from irrigating lawns and gardens, which accounts for the majority of the city’s water use. Local water officials also admit luck had a lot to do with it. As if on cue, rain clouds and cooler temperatures fell upon the city shortly after the call for conservation began, eliminating much of the temptation for residents to sneak a few gallons for roses and other water-thirsty plants.
NEWS
By Megan O’Neil | January 14, 2010
In a neighborhood of crisp green lawns and colorful rose bushes, Don and Denise Hahn’s yard is a lesson in subtlety. Clumps of wild-looking grasses sit next to spiky aloe plants which rest under the shade of palo verde trees, all of which melts into the natural vista of the foothills. “I am just a regionalist,” Denise Hahn said. “Everything should look like it is in Southern California. I think it is ridiculous to waste water on sod that doesn’t want to be here in the first place.
NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | March 12, 2009
As we head into spring and ultimately the dry weather of summer, local water authorities hope a new style of water conservation signs will bring increased awareness to residents? extraordinary need to conserve water. Signs went up around La Cañada in the past week, which show a new coding system to let people know how desperate the water situation may be. This week, the sign in front of the La Cañada Union 76 shows a water drop inside a bright yellow box, with ? in small lettering inside the water drop ?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2014
The Los Angeles Times recently published a story, “Most L.A. County cities failing to protect historic sites, study says, ” about a Preservation Report Card issued by the Los Angeles Conservancy. In it, the writer reports that La Cañada Flintridge was one of several cities to receive a failing grade. I think the Conservancy and the story's writer should have done more research. I want La Cañada residents to know the city has spent significant monies, about half a million dollars, to restore and maintain our most precious historic facility, Lanterman House.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 23, 2014
Foothill Municipal Water District officials are alerting customers to limit water consumption following Gov. Jerry Brown's drought emergency announcement last week.  Two consecutive dry years and the state's snowpack registering at only 20% of average water content prompted the area water board to change its conservation stage to “green,” according to a statement from Nina Jazmadarian, general manager at Foothill Municipal Water District.  ...
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | February 14, 2013
Officials are asking residents and businesses in La Cañada Flintridge, La Crescenta and Pasadena to conserve water during an upcoming eight-day pipeline shutdown, Feb. 21 through Feb. 28. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is upgrading an upper feeder pipeline, which delivers drinking water to 250,000 people in the region. Officials are asking the affected communities to refrain from outdoor watering, washing cars, hosing sidewalks and leaving tap water running.
THE818NOW
October 30, 2012
The Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy on Monday approved a $50,000 grant for the repair and improvement of La Cañada Flintridge's eroding Flint Wash Trail. La Cañada City Councilman Donald Voss, who is a member of the conservancy's Advisory Committee, said he and Assemblyman Anthony Portantino (D-La Cañada Flintridge) spoke in favor of the grant at the agency's Oct. 29 meeting. In a statement, Portantino said that it was crucial that the trail be maintained to provide a link for hikers, bikers and equestrians between La Cañada and Hahamongna Park in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | August 25, 2012
Local water officials continue to push clients to use water conservation measures, offering an array of rebates to residents who upgrade fixtures and appliances or replace grassy lawns with less thirsty plants. The Foothill Municipal Water District is offering rebates to homeowners who place barrels under drain spouts to catch rain water for irrigation, install efficient lawn sprinklers and switch to low-flow toilets and washers, as well as to those who get rid of their turf. Nina Jazmadarian, Foothill's general manager, said the turf rebate has proven popular in La Cañada, with the utility using more than $25,000 in rebate set-asides last year and expecting to do the same this year.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
A terrific organization is having a positive impact on the foothills from La Crescenta to Altadena. Founded in 2000, the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy has preserved natural areas, planned regional trail systems and educated residents about issues pertaining to local history and open space. Recently, the Arroyos and Foothills Conservancy (AFC) successfully secured funding to purchase, preserve and maintain land in La Crescenta. The 7.75-acre property is located atop Rosemont Avenue.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In regard to Megan O'Neil's article, “Trust eyes foothill parcel” (Jan. 19), thank you, thank you to the Whalin family and the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy for working together to help preserve a small piece of the beautiful and wild hillsides that so define La Crescenta. It fills my heart to know that the cry of the red-tail hawks, the perfume of the sage bushes, the cool shade of the oaks, and the deer and coyote habitat will be around for my children and grandchildren to enjoy as much as I do. I have known the Arroyos and Foothills Conservancy for many years, and have seen the work it has done in stewarding similar property in the foothills above Altadena.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | August 24, 2011
La Cañada Flintridge is one of the greenest cities in the region - and not only because of all the trees lining its streets. The city has three times as many residential solar installations as Pasadena or La Crescenta, and more participating businesses in a regional battery recycling program than any other city. According to the state's GoSolar.org website, which tracks solar installations through its California Solar Initiative rebate program, La Cañada Flintridge is home to 116 residential solar installations, versus 38 in Pasadena and 34 in La Crescenta.
NEWS
May 4, 2011
Conservation may not be the solution to California’s water problem, but it is an important part of a multi-faceted approach to solving our state’s water needs. Drought is normal for California. Thirty-seven of the last 40 centuries have been dry (“Water in California,” by David Carle). The 20th century was one of the three wet centuries; California’s growth was predicated on the expectation of an uncharacteristic amount of water. As much as 70% of residential water use is for landscaping.
NEWS
By Anita Brenner | April 27, 2011
The drought is officially over. “After nearly three years under a state of water emergency, heavy snowfall and rebounding reservoir levels prompted Gov. Jerry Brown to declare late last month that California’s drought is officially over.” (“Following the flow back to the source,” by Joe Piasecki, Valley Sun 4-13-11). Despite the official announcement that the drought is over, water costs in La Cañada Flintridge will remain high, much higher than in the surrounding communities of Pasadena and Glendale.
La Canada Valley Sun Articles La Canada Valley Sun Articles
|