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Carbon Dioxide

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NEWS
May 14, 2012
A scientific instrument designed to take the most meaningful snapshot yet of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere is on its way to space, via a lengthy testing detour in Arizona. On May 9 Jet Propulsion Laboratory workers in La Canada Flintridge sent the instrument, part of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, to Gilbert, Ariz., where it will be tested and integrated with the satellite that will house it. NASA plans to launch the OCO-2 from Vandenberg Air Force Base by the summer of 2014.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | February 19, 2009
La Cañada resident and Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer Moustafa Chahine was recently elected to one to the highest professional distinctions accorded to engineers and scientists as a member of the National Academy of Engineering. ?It was a surprise,? Chahine said on being told of the honor. Chahine is the senior research scientist at JPL, he moved with his wife Marina to La Cañada in 1960 and raised his two sons: Tony, an eye doctor and Steve, a writer. Marina Chahine is a longtime teacher at La Cañada High School who is presently teaching advanced placement history courses.
NEWS
By Sara Cardine | December 22, 2009
As world leaders in Copenhagen last week negotiated a global response to the threat of impending climate change, a different meeting of the minds was taking place in San Francisco. As many as 15,000 of the world’s leading scientists in astrophysics, oceanography and Earth science convened at the American Geophysical Union conference in an attempt to better understand the scope of changing weather patterns and what it could mean for future generations. Among them was JPL scientist and longtime La Cañada resident Moustafa Chahine.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 17, 2008
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge has launched a new website that has gone global, literally. The website http://climate.jpl.nasa.gov allows the viewer to explore the global climate change. ?This website has attracted more attention than any other website I have worked on,? said Michael Gunson, JPL chief scientist for Earth science technology. The website covers a multitude of areas concerning climate change from raising sea levels to carbon dioxide levels.
NEWS
By Michael J. Arvizu | April 1, 2010
Jet Propulsion Laboratory held its second annual Climate Day event at the Pasadena Convention Center Friday and Saturday, attended by more than 1,400 children and 120 educators representing seven Southern California school districts, including home and charter schools. The event was in the making for about a year, said Annie Richardson, JPL outreach specialist. Climate Day was first held in 2008, with organizers taking 2009 off to prepare for this year?s event, Richardson said.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | August 24, 2006
A hypothesis by scientists, including those at JPL, has been developed to explain mysterious dark spots, fan-like markings and spider-shaped features that have been seen in images from Mars Odyssey orbiter. "We called it a cryptic region," said Jeff Plautt, project scientist for Mars Odyssey. After hundreds of new images from Odyssey, scientists now feel that jets of carbon dioxide gas erupt in a geyser-like fashion from beneath the ice cap as it warms in the spring. "Every winter there is a layer of carbon dioxide ice that is about three feet deep.
NEWS
By Jennifer Berry | April 27, 2006
La Cañada Valley Beautiful and the city of La Cañada Flintridge planted a European white birch tree in Memorial Park in honor of Arbor Day on Tuesday. "This birch is a very graceful tree," Rose Manning, president of La Cañada Valley Beautiful, said. "We feel it's a beautiful tree, and we're proud to dedicate it to the city of La Cañada." The tree will grow to between 30 and 40 feet tall with a branch spread of 25 to 35 feet. It will be a great tree to sit under during events, such as Music in the Park, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Loa Blasucci | February 7, 2008
For centuries, scientists and philosophers researched why this ethereal center of love we call our heart, houses feelings and emotions as well as pumping blood through the entire cardiovascular system. After all, isn’t it just another organ like the others in your body? The human heart is a double pump. It receives blood low in oxygen from the body tissues and sends it to the lungs for a quick fix. It finely adjusts the rate of contraction and blood pressure, adjusts the carbon dioxide and miraculously, sends it all back to the tissues of the body with all levels balanced according to your body’s needs at that moment.
NEWS
By Nicholas Louie | June 26, 2008
Friday marked the first day of summer and summer arrived not with a gentle knock but with a battering ram as the sun ravished the Crescenta-Cañada Valley in a heat wave that lasted nearly eight days. ?Summer?s starting with a sizzle, which might be a preview of coming attractions,? said climatologist Bill Patzert of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Temperatures started to rise Sunday, June 15, and didn?t begin to taper until Monday, June 23, with the return of cool westerly winds from the ocean.
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NEWS
May 14, 2012
A scientific instrument designed to take the most meaningful snapshot yet of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere is on its way to space, via a lengthy testing detour in Arizona. On May 9 Jet Propulsion Laboratory workers in La Canada Flintridge sent the instrument, part of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, to Gilbert, Ariz., where it will be tested and integrated with the satellite that will house it. NASA plans to launch the OCO-2 from Vandenberg Air Force Base by the summer of 2014.
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NEWS
By Sara Cardine | December 22, 2009
As world leaders in Copenhagen last week negotiated a global response to the threat of impending climate change, a different meeting of the minds was taking place in San Francisco. As many as 15,000 of the world’s leading scientists in astrophysics, oceanography and Earth science convened at the American Geophysical Union conference in an attempt to better understand the scope of changing weather patterns and what it could mean for future generations. Among them was JPL scientist and longtime La Cañada resident Moustafa Chahine.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | February 19, 2009
La Cañada resident and Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer Moustafa Chahine was recently elected to one to the highest professional distinctions accorded to engineers and scientists as a member of the National Academy of Engineering. ?It was a surprise,? Chahine said on being told of the honor. Chahine is the senior research scientist at JPL, he moved with his wife Marina to La Cañada in 1960 and raised his two sons: Tony, an eye doctor and Steve, a writer. Marina Chahine is a longtime teacher at La Cañada High School who is presently teaching advanced placement history courses.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | July 17, 2008
Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge has launched a new website that has gone global, literally. The website http://climate.jpl.nasa.gov allows the viewer to explore the global climate change. ?This website has attracted more attention than any other website I have worked on,? said Michael Gunson, JPL chief scientist for Earth science technology. The website covers a multitude of areas concerning climate change from raising sea levels to carbon dioxide levels.
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