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NEWS
March 13, 2014
La Cañada resident and Caltech bioengineer Frances Arnold has been selected for induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame for her pioneering work in bioengineering and directed evolution, Caltech announced this week. Arnold, a co-inventor on more than 300 U.S. patents, is being specifically recognized for her work on the directed evolution of enzymes. One of 15 recipients of this year's honor, she will be recognized at a May 21 induction ceremony at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. The award is one more in a string of internationally recognized honors.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | July 25, 2012
You'd think that Caltech would be in the forefront of online learning, but the Beavers are late to this rodeo. This week, Caltech finally announced that it will provide free online classes thought Coursera ("The World's Best Courses. Online, for Free. ") Coursera ( www.coursera.org ) was created last fall by two Stanford computer-science professors, Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng. Coursera is a for-profit start-up. It began with free classes from Stanford, Penn, Princeton, and the University of Michigan.
COMMUNITY
July 24, 2013
On Sunday, even before I opened my eyes, I knew that it was going to be a different kind of summer day. The breeze coming through the window was cool and fragrant. The birds in the trees outside seemed to be happier than usual, and chirping loudly. It was a perfect opportunity for me to make a cup of coffee and climb back into bed to finish the book I had been glued to for the previous few days. The book that had captured my almost undivided attention is "Inferno" by Dan Brown. It is based on Dante's famed epic poem and set in my favorite country in the world, Italy.
NEWS
March 3, 2005
The Sally Ride Science Festival is coming to Caltech on Saturday, March 19. The festival is the brainchild of Sally Ride, America's first female astronaut, and is primarily geared toward girls in grades five through eight, their parents and educators. That age group is a critical time for girls and science, since studies show that this is when they begin to drift away from their natural interests in science and math. That's a situation that Ride, the Ingrid and Joseph Hibben professor of space science and professor of physics at UC San Diego, has devoted a large portion of her life to reversing.
NEWS
November 5, 2009
James K. Knowles, emeritus William R. Kenan professor and professor of applied mechanics at Caltech, died Nov. 1. He was born April 14, 1931, in Cleveland, Ohio, to Allyan Emma Gray and Newton Talbot Knowles. He was noted for exceptional teaching and research in continuum and structural mechanics and applied mathematics at MIT, where he received his bachelor and doctorate degrees, and at Caltech, where he was on the faculty from 1958 to 1996 and named honorary alumnus. He also was known for his leadership and commitment to excellence in science, students and the greater campus community.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | February 7, 2008
On Feb. 15 Jet Propulsion Laboratory employees will be back in district court concerning their lawsuit against NASA. Twenty-eight scientists and engineers at JPL filed the suit challenging NASA?s requirement of background investigations that they contend are unconstitutional. The background checks were required in 2007 by NASA in accordance to a 2004 Bush administration directive. Background checks are required by all governmental offices due to this directive but each office can choose their own procedure, said Virginia Keeny, attorney for the JPL employees.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | January 17, 2008
Lawyers for Jet Propulsion Laboratory employees who are suing NASA/Caltech are now preparing briefs for their next court appearance on Feb. 15, as their case moves into the discovery phase and on to district court. On Friday, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals came back with a decision in favor of the JPL employees and against NASA/Caltech. ?We did get a decision in the employees? favor from the Ninth Circuit upholding the preliminary injunction,? said Virginia Keeny, one of the attorneys for the scientists and engineers.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | January 14, 2008
  On Friday the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals returned a decision in favor of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory employees and against NASA/Caltech in an ongoing court battle over security background checks. The case began in August 2007 when employees from JPL/Caltech were required to submit to background checks in accordance to a Bush Administration executive order. The 28 employees who brought the suit claimed that the background checks violated their constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | November 2, 2006
Seventy years ago this Halloween a few students from California Institute of Technology and a couple of friends found an out-of-the-way area in the Arroyo Seco to test their experimental motor. It was in fact the world's first liquid-fueled rocket motors and it was the beginning of JPL. "One member of the [Caltech] faculty , Theodore von Karman, was with them," said Erik Conway, JPL historian. In 1936 the area now occupied by JPL was isolated about three miles north of the Rose Bowl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 13, 2014
La Cañada resident and Caltech bioengineer Frances Arnold has been selected for induction into the National Inventors Hall of Fame for her pioneering work in bioengineering and directed evolution, Caltech announced this week. Arnold, a co-inventor on more than 300 U.S. patents, is being specifically recognized for her work on the directed evolution of enzymes. One of 15 recipients of this year's honor, she will be recognized at a May 21 induction ceremony at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Va. The award is one more in a string of internationally recognized honors.
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NEWS
By Sara Cardine,sara.cardine@latimes.com | March 13, 2014
From the outside, room 604 looks like any other classroom on the La Cañada High School campus. But inside, the former wood shop room is a bustling workshop filled with wires, gadgets, computers and all the necessary ingredients required to animate a robot. This is the humble home of the LCHS Engineering Club, which in its seven-year existence, has transformed the lives of students whose interests in building, computers and robotics had previously lain dormant, undiscovered and untapped.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | September 4, 2013
Flags at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge were lowered to half staff last week as the NASA center honored former JPL director Bruce C. Murray, who passed away at 81. Murray died on Thursday, Aug. 29 at his home in Oceanside after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. He was director of the lab from 1976 to 1982. During his watch, he saw Voyager 1 and 2 launch to explore Jupiter and Saturn, and Viking land on Mars. He was also a scientist on the first Mars missions - Mariner 3 and 4. After he left JPL, Murray became a professor of planetary science and geology at Caltech in Pasadena.
COMMUNITY
July 24, 2013
On Sunday, even before I opened my eyes, I knew that it was going to be a different kind of summer day. The breeze coming through the window was cool and fragrant. The birds in the trees outside seemed to be happier than usual, and chirping loudly. It was a perfect opportunity for me to make a cup of coffee and climb back into bed to finish the book I had been glued to for the previous few days. The book that had captured my almost undivided attention is "Inferno" by Dan Brown. It is based on Dante's famed epic poem and set in my favorite country in the world, Italy.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 4, 2013
Thirty-two students in aerospace, engineering and science programs in 11 different countries descended on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory last week as part of a Caltech competition to design a mission to one of Mars' two moons, Phobos or Deimos. "Watching the enthusiasm there was just really impressive," said Jason Rabinovitch, a Caltech graduate student who co-organized the program with fellow graduate student Nick Parziale. Parziale added that students, who visited JPL for a tour, had to be dragged away from each station during the tour.
COMMUNITY
By Jane Napier Neely | August 25, 2012
Hallelujah, on Wednesday morning I awoke to a cool and refreshing beginning to the day. At last the oppressive heat wave we had been experiencing had broken. I know that our hot days are only at bay for a little while, but what a delight it was to feel natural cool air. I even did a little happy dance in front of the thermostat when I saw that it registered only 70 degrees. This was one of life's little pleasures. See? I'm not hard to please. Speaking of weather and such, even though a week ago Saturday was one of those stifling hot days, the olive grove outside Beckman Auditorium on the Caltech campus was a remarkably pleasant and shaded place to be when Muse/ique began its second concert of the season.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | July 25, 2012
You'd think that Caltech would be in the forefront of online learning, but the Beavers are late to this rodeo. This week, Caltech finally announced that it will provide free online classes thought Coursera ("The World's Best Courses. Online, for Free. ") Coursera ( www.coursera.org ) was created last fall by two Stanford computer-science professors, Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng. Coursera is a for-profit start-up. It began with free classes from Stanford, Penn, Princeton, and the University of Michigan.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | July 8, 2012
With a clang of giant levers and the launch of a soda-bottle rocket, Kidspace Children's Museum is opening an expansive new outdoor playground that aims to make physics fun. The 30,000-square-foot Robert & Mary Galvin Physics Forest, debuting Thursday, offers 13 interactive exhibits that demonstrate fundamental scientific concepts and encourage hands-on learning. Velocity, trajectory and force are at work in a 50-foot rubber ball firing range. Potential energy becomes kinetic energy in the “roller coaster,” in which users must get a ball through a tangle of interchangeable tubes that include a loop-de-loop and other obstacles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2011
Two women who started their educational paths in La Cañada Flintridge, Lauren Poindexter and Elizabeth Gilliam, are in the same class at Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine in Roanoke, Va. and recently participated in the “White Coat” ceremony there. Poindexter is a 1998 graduate of La Cañada High School who attended USC and then earned a master's degree in kinesiology from University of Arkansas. She is vice president of the medical school's Class of 2015. Gilliam, who graduated from LCHS in 2003, attended Caltech for her undergraduate studies.
SPORTS
November 26, 2011
GIRLS' BASKETBALL Flintridge Prep 42, Morningside L.A. 31: The Rebels finished ninth in the San Gabriel Valley Classic Tournament with a win on Saturday at San Marino High. Maya Okamoto led the way for Prep (2-2) with 20 points and Kimberly Kim added six. It was the second win in a row for the Rebels, who beat Sacred Heart L.A., 36-31, in the tournament at San Marino on Friday. Okamato had 13 points and Kim had 10 points and eight rebounds in the victory. Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy 67, Immaculate Heart 54: The Tologs put their first-game blunder behind them and started a winning streak with their second straight win, a 13-point victory in the San Gabriel Valley Classic Tournament at South Pasadena High Friday.
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