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NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | December 25, 2008
They call him Father Christmas, though he’s hardly old enough to have been around since the reputed 17th century old gentleman. However, just like the traditional jolly, gift-bearing gent, La Cañada’s own Perry Mondon, 64, gives a gift to his neighborhood, and beyond, each year through the creation of his illuminated cactus Christmas-land, as well as through his year-round kind and neighborly demeanor. “We’re very fortunate to live next door to Perry,” said Peter Bissias, who bought his home 15 years ago and lives there with his wife, Michele and daughter, Taia, 4. The family enjoys living next door to Mondon and his extravagantly festive property, which features thousands of lights and Christmas-themed displays.
NEWS
By Reg Green | July 9, 2013
Have you noticed that in La Cañada the trees stop where the national forest begins? Look down sometime from the Cherry Canyon trail. Although there is not an empty lot to be seen, trees dominate the entire view. Their variety is equally astonishing even for someone who has never hugged a tree in his life. (Well, hardly ever.) To name a few: the groves of deodars that always put me in mind of the phantom wood in Disney's “Snow White” and, at the other end of the cultural scale, the orderly rows of cedar more suited to classical Rome; the startling splotches of gold and red among the evergreens in the fall and the delicate purple jacaranda in the spring that would be more at home in the tropics than in Granola Park - sorry, Glenola.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2004
Shirley's Sunshine By Shirley DeGrey This is wind weather in La Cañada - not hurricane time, but there is definite movement of leaves, small branches, large branches and total trees from their roots fastened firmly into LCF soil. Seeing a large, leafy tree bend double and sweep the ground is quite a sight. Later in the weather season, those green and golden leaves will have tuend a brilliant yellow, gold, orange and brown, and then they will turn themselves loose from their branches and sail around above our garden plants.
NEWS
December 22, 2005
Poinsettias, amaryllis, and Christmas cactus are some of the plants you're likely to have around the home or office this season. The temptation is to think of them as disposable decorations, but with a little TLC, you can keep these living symbols of the holidays around for months or years. That beautiful plant you received as a gift or bought at the store probably has its container swathed in festive watertight wrapping of red, gold, green, or silver. The first thing to do is to cut a hole in the bottom of the wrapper for easy draining - nothing kills most plants faster than leaving their roots in standing water day after day. Keep in mind that the air inside most homes this time of year is arid from heaters and fireplaces.
NEWS
February 8, 2004
A 20-year-old tradition continues on Sunday, Nov. 2 when the La Canada Flintridge Tournament of Roses Association presents its annual "Evening of Wine and Roses" at Brookside Country Club in Pasadena. The newly-crowned 2004 Rose Queen and Royal Court will make their debut to local civic leaders at the event. Proceeds from the fund-raiser will enable the Association's 26th Rose Parade float, "Cactus Practice," to roll down Colorado Boulevard on Jan. 1, 2004. Festivities begin Sunday at 5 p.m. with an incredible array of hors d'oeuvres created by Chef Richard Swenson of Brookside.
NEWS
May 13, 2004
rendering revealed By Jane Napier Neely Activity is revving up for the 2005 LCF Tournament of Roses float entry, "Family Getaway." LCF Tournament of Roses member, Jennifer Swain, should be taking a bow. Her concept of three frogs escaping on a bicycle built for three from a French restaurant advertising the daily special of frogs' legs and its chef trying to catch them, was accepted as the winning entry in the annual float concept contest....
NEWS
By Charles Cooper | April 13, 2006
La Cañada Flintridge residents have to remember that horses have the right of way on city trails under a new ordinance adopted by the City Council. Pedestrians and bicyclists must yield the way to equestrians under the ordinance. Bicyclists must also yield the right-of-way to pedestrians. The council adopted the ordinance as an addendum to the trails master plan that is being developed. They cover trails owned by the city and those under other ownerships, including the county.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | December 5, 2012
Fiona Bayliss' Montrose boutique is stuffed with holiday items, antiques and hard-to-find pieces of furniture, but for the first time in decades Bayliss is not there to sell them. On Nov. 29, Bayliss died in her sleep at her La Crescenta home, according to friends. The longtime Montrose shop owner was 93. “There isn't anything negative to say about her,” said Larry Moss, a friend of Bayliss' for 50 years. “She was a very positive, caring, generous person who was full of life.
COMMUNITY
November 26, 2013
Ten Years Ago The La Cañada Flintridge Tournament of Roses Assn. set up a “floatique” gift center at the Ralphs Fresh Fare market on Foothill at Gould to raise funds for “Cactus Practice,” its 2004 float entry in the Rose Parade. Items for sale included sweat shirts, T-shirts, pins, patches and other unique items depicting the La Cañada Flintridge float.  Twenty Years Ago The manager of La Cañada's Pizza Hut was threatened by a knife-wielding robber on a Friday morning in November 1993 as he walked to his vehicle en route to the bank with the store's deposit.
FEATURES
By Jane Napier Neely | October 2, 2008
The Society of Fellows’ annual Huntington Ball is always an eagerly anticipated social event extraordinaire and this year’s presentation was a grand and elegant celebration. Chairing this year’s ball was the La Cañada Flintridge mother/daughter team of Heather and Blythe Haaga . Every detail of this lovely evening was perfection. Blythe, who lives and works in Chicago, made several planning trips here to make certain that all would be in readiness for the big night.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Reg Green | July 9, 2013
Have you noticed that in La Cañada the trees stop where the national forest begins? Look down sometime from the Cherry Canyon trail. Although there is not an empty lot to be seen, trees dominate the entire view. Their variety is equally astonishing even for someone who has never hugged a tree in his life. (Well, hardly ever.) To name a few: the groves of deodars that always put me in mind of the phantom wood in Disney's “Snow White” and, at the other end of the cultural scale, the orderly rows of cedar more suited to classical Rome; the startling splotches of gold and red among the evergreens in the fall and the delicate purple jacaranda in the spring that would be more at home in the tropics than in Granola Park - sorry, Glenola.
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NEWS
By Ruth Longoria | December 25, 2008
They call him Father Christmas, though he’s hardly old enough to have been around since the reputed 17th century old gentleman. However, just like the traditional jolly, gift-bearing gent, La Cañada’s own Perry Mondon, 64, gives a gift to his neighborhood, and beyond, each year through the creation of his illuminated cactus Christmas-land, as well as through his year-round kind and neighborly demeanor. “We’re very fortunate to live next door to Perry,” said Peter Bissias, who bought his home 15 years ago and lives there with his wife, Michele and daughter, Taia, 4. The family enjoys living next door to Mondon and his extravagantly festive property, which features thousands of lights and Christmas-themed displays.
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