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Bath Salts

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NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | October 20, 2012
For several months, Will Moffitt has been warning us about “bath salts.” Bath salts is the innocuous name given to a group of designer drugs that resemble Epsom salts. The recipes for these drugs vary, but usually contain a synthetic benzoylethanamine or cathinone, which have effects similar to ecstasy and cocaine. Moffitt is a former La Cañada Unified School District board member, past president of the LCF Educational Foundation and current chairman of the La Cañada Community Prevention Council.
NEWS
By Richard Winton | January 24, 2014
Federal jurors deliberating an excessive-force and civil rights case of a former Hollywood executive against the LAPD on Friday asked to inspect the baton of an officer he says severely beat him. The request from the eight-person jury came before the lunch break on the first day of deliberations. Brian Mulligan, a former co-chairman of Universal Pictures and onetime Deutsche Bank vice chairman, suffered multiple nose fractures, a broken shoulder blade and a bloody scalp after two Los Angeles police officers took him into custody in Highland Park in May 2012, he says.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
A former banking and Hollywood executive testified in court Tuesday that he was not under the influence of bath salts when, as he claims in his use-of-force lawsuit, he was badly beaten during a confrontation with two Los Angeles police officers. La Cañada resident Brian Mulligan, the former vice chairman of Deutsche Bank and former co-chairman of Universal Pictures, who sued the LAPD, testified in the first day of his trial that an encounter with Officers James Nichols and John Miller in Eagle Rock in 2012 left him with 15 broken bones in his face and 54 stitches and required several surgeries, the Los Angeles Times reports . But Denise Zimmerman, an attorney for one of the officers, told jurors Mulligan was snarling and thrashing and stiffened his finger like claws.
NEWS
By Richard Winton | January 24, 2014
A federal jury on Friday found that two Los Angeles police officers did not use excessive force when they arrested a one-time bank and Hollywood executive they believed to be under the influence of the drug bath salts, the Los Angeles Times reports. Brian Mulligan, 54, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, James Nichols and John Miller, in federal court. He alleged they violated his civil rights, used unreasonable force and committed battery during a May 16, 2012, arrest.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | November 21, 2012
On the second day of November, two busloads of Occupy L.A. protesters arrived in La Cañada Flintridge. Their destination: Commonwealth Avenue. Their target: the home of “a Deutsche Bank executive,” a sheriff's spokesperson told the Valley Sun. At first, La Cañadans were confused. Why would Occupy L.A. come to La Cañada Flintridge? And then, we learned that the demonstration concerned “a Deutsche Bank executive.” It turned out that it wasn't just any Deutsche Bank executive, but a true local celebrity, Brian Mulligan, who filed a $50-million claim against the city of Los Angeles alleging that in May, he was imprisoned in a motel room by the Los Angeles Police Department and then beaten.
COMMUNITY
January 22, 2014
The Foothill Auxiliary of Ahead With Horses will hold its annual Valentine luncheon and auction, “Buttons and Bows,” on Feb. 7 at Brookside Golf Club in Pasadena. For many years the local auxiliary raised funds for Children's Home Society, but that agency eliminated its statewide auxiliary program. Looking to continue their activities in support of children, members voted to support the Ahead With Horses group. This nonprofit provides equestrian-based therapeutic programs for disabled, disadvantaged and special needs programs.
NEWS
By Richard Winton and By Richard Winton | January 23, 2014
A onetime Deutsche Bank executive and former co-chair of Universal Pictures testified in court Wednesday that he had taken bath salts 20 times prior to his run-in with Los Angeles police - but that it did not make him paranoid. Brian Mulligan has sued the Los Angeles Police Department for excessive force . The La Cañada Flintridge resident took the stand in the trial, which began this week, testifying that an officer's baton fractured his nose and broke his shoulder blade, the Los Angeles Times reports . Mulligan said the last time he took the synthetic drug he called "white lightning" was two weeks prior to the May 2012 encounter with police.
NEWS
By Richard Winton and By Richard Winton | January 21, 2014
A judge will allow a recording of a former Hollywood and banking executive acknowledging he used bath salts to be used only for impeachment purposes in his civil rights trial against Los Angeles police for beating him during an arrest. U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner made the decision Tuesday as the civil rights and excessive force case against the LAPD began Tuesday for La Cañada resident Brian Mulligan , a former Universal and Deutsche Bank executive. The decision means Mulligan's statements to Glendale police two days before the LAPD arrest could be used only if he contradicts them in court, the Los Angeles Times reports . The judge also decided the eight-person jury will not hear allegations that one of the officers Mulligan says beat him, James Nichols, was under investigation for sex acts with women informants unless they first find excessive force was used.
NEWS
By Dan Loumena | January 26, 2014
Steven Holcomb, the veteran bobsled champion, and Kate Hansen, a promising slider in the luge from La Cañada Flintridge, made it a banner day for U.S. competitors in season-ending World Cup competitions on Saturday. Holcomb became the seventh two-man bobsled pilot in World Cup history to win a second season title when he and brakeman Curt Tomasevicz finished seventh in Konigssee, Germany, on Saturday, the Los Angeles Times reports .  Hansen became the first American to win a major singles luge competition since 2009 and a World Cup event since 1997 when she took the victory in Sigulda, Latvia.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Dan Loumena | January 26, 2014
Steven Holcomb, the veteran bobsled champion, and Kate Hansen, a promising slider in the luge from La Cañada Flintridge, made it a banner day for U.S. competitors in season-ending World Cup competitions on Saturday. Holcomb became the seventh two-man bobsled pilot in World Cup history to win a second season title when he and brakeman Curt Tomasevicz finished seventh in Konigssee, Germany, on Saturday, the Los Angeles Times reports .  Hansen became the first American to win a major singles luge competition since 2009 and a World Cup event since 1997 when she took the victory in Sigulda, Latvia.
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NEWS
By Richard Winton | January 24, 2014
A federal jury on Friday found that two Los Angeles police officers did not use excessive force when they arrested a one-time bank and Hollywood executive they believed to be under the influence of the drug bath salts, the Los Angeles Times reports. Brian Mulligan, 54, sued the Los Angeles Police Department and two of its officers, James Nichols and John Miller, in federal court. He alleged they violated his civil rights, used unreasonable force and committed battery during a May 16, 2012, arrest.
NEWS
By Richard Winton | January 24, 2014
Federal jurors deliberating an excessive-force and civil rights case of a former Hollywood executive against the LAPD on Friday asked to inspect the baton of an officer he says severely beat him. The request from the eight-person jury came before the lunch break on the first day of deliberations. Brian Mulligan, a former co-chairman of Universal Pictures and onetime Deutsche Bank vice chairman, suffered multiple nose fractures, a broken shoulder blade and a bloody scalp after two Los Angeles police officers took him into custody in Highland Park in May 2012, he says.
NEWS
By Richard Winton and By Richard Winton | January 23, 2014
A onetime Deutsche Bank executive and former co-chair of Universal Pictures testified in court Wednesday that he had taken bath salts 20 times prior to his run-in with Los Angeles police - but that it did not make him paranoid. Brian Mulligan has sued the Los Angeles Police Department for excessive force . The La Cañada Flintridge resident took the stand in the trial, which began this week, testifying that an officer's baton fractured his nose and broke his shoulder blade, the Los Angeles Times reports . Mulligan said the last time he took the synthetic drug he called "white lightning" was two weeks prior to the May 2012 encounter with police.
COMMUNITY
January 22, 2014
The Foothill Auxiliary of Ahead With Horses will hold its annual Valentine luncheon and auction, “Buttons and Bows,” on Feb. 7 at Brookside Golf Club in Pasadena. For many years the local auxiliary raised funds for Children's Home Society, but that agency eliminated its statewide auxiliary program. Looking to continue their activities in support of children, members voted to support the Ahead With Horses group. This nonprofit provides equestrian-based therapeutic programs for disabled, disadvantaged and special needs programs.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
A former banking and Hollywood executive testified in court Tuesday that he was not under the influence of bath salts when, as he claims in his use-of-force lawsuit, he was badly beaten during a confrontation with two Los Angeles police officers. La Cañada resident Brian Mulligan, the former vice chairman of Deutsche Bank and former co-chairman of Universal Pictures, who sued the LAPD, testified in the first day of his trial that an encounter with Officers James Nichols and John Miller in Eagle Rock in 2012 left him with 15 broken bones in his face and 54 stitches and required several surgeries, the Los Angeles Times reports . But Denise Zimmerman, an attorney for one of the officers, told jurors Mulligan was snarling and thrashing and stiffened his finger like claws.
NEWS
By Richard Winton and By Richard Winton | January 21, 2014
A judge will allow a recording of a former Hollywood and banking executive acknowledging he used bath salts to be used only for impeachment purposes in his civil rights trial against Los Angeles police for beating him during an arrest. U.S. District Judge R. Gary Klausner made the decision Tuesday as the civil rights and excessive force case against the LAPD began Tuesday for La Cañada resident Brian Mulligan , a former Universal and Deutsche Bank executive. The decision means Mulligan's statements to Glendale police two days before the LAPD arrest could be used only if he contradicts them in court, the Los Angeles Times reports . The judge also decided the eight-person jury will not hear allegations that one of the officers Mulligan says beat him, James Nichols, was under investigation for sex acts with women informants unless they first find excessive force was used.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | November 21, 2012
On the second day of November, two busloads of Occupy L.A. protesters arrived in La Cañada Flintridge. Their destination: Commonwealth Avenue. Their target: the home of “a Deutsche Bank executive,” a sheriff's spokesperson told the Valley Sun. At first, La Cañadans were confused. Why would Occupy L.A. come to La Cañada Flintridge? And then, we learned that the demonstration concerned “a Deutsche Bank executive.” It turned out that it wasn't just any Deutsche Bank executive, but a true local celebrity, Brian Mulligan, who filed a $50-million claim against the city of Los Angeles alleging that in May, he was imprisoned in a motel room by the Los Angeles Police Department and then beaten.
NEWS
By Anita S. Brenner | October 20, 2012
For several months, Will Moffitt has been warning us about “bath salts.” Bath salts is the innocuous name given to a group of designer drugs that resemble Epsom salts. The recipes for these drugs vary, but usually contain a synthetic benzoylethanamine or cathinone, which have effects similar to ecstasy and cocaine. Moffitt is a former La Cañada Unified School District board member, past president of the LCF Educational Foundation and current chairman of the La Cañada Community Prevention Council.
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