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Angeles National Forest

NEWS
December 26, 2012
Authorities on Wednesday continued to try and ascertain the identity of a hiker who was found dead Saturday morning in the Angeles National Forest. Another hiker found the man's body around 7:47 a.m. near the Gould Mesa Debris Basin Dam on the east trail near La Cañada Flintridge, said Crescenta Valley Sheriff's Sgt. Cynthia Gonzales. It appeared the body had been there for several days, said Los Angeles County Assistant Chief Coroner Ed Winter. Authorities said Saturday that there had been no recent reports of missing hikers in the area.
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NEWS
By Ari Bloomekatz and Jason Wells | December 23, 2013
The four mountain bikers who went missing in the Angeles National Forest on Sunday were not familiar with the trail they were on and were ill-equipped for the elements, authorities said. The search began about 7 p.m. when the four cyclists were several hours late returning from their planned ride from Mt. Wilson to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Windsor turnout in Pasadena, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. Sheriff's Deputy Dan Paige told NBC Los Angeles that it appeared it was first time the men - who range in age from 28 to 38 - had taken the trail.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
  The Sharp fire in Angeles National Forest near Wrightwood has now covered 100 acres, but firefighters have been able to make some headway as the fireline moves southeast away from the town. The Sharp fire had already doubled in size to 60 acres overnight . There are 380 firefighters assigned to the blaze, which is moving in steep, inaccessible terrain, the Los Angeles Times reported . The fire, first reported about 12:15 p.m. Thursday, prompted officials to issue mandatory evacuation orders for Mojave Scenic and East Canyon drives south from Lone Pine Canyon Road to Buckthorn, Slippery Elm and Mahogany roads.
NEWS
By Tiffany Kelly, tiffany.kelly@latimes.com | April 26, 2013
Firefighters and rescuers who patrol the Angeles National Forest respond to hundreds of incidents every year, ranging from cars that fall off the highway to hikers who become lost or injured. On Friday morning, they practiced hoisting victims from a helicopter and up the side of the cliff, techniques that could one day be used to save a life. It was the first day of an annual Los Angeles County training exercise. Montrose Search and Rescue, Altadena Search and Rescue, Urban Search and Rescue, Los Angeles County Air Operations and the U.S. Forest Service all participated.
NEWS
By Jennifer Berry | September 30, 2004
Regardless of lower temperatures the area is experiencing this week, fire danger in the Angeles National Forest remains high. "The fire danger really has not subsided at all. Vegetation is every bit as dry now as it was earlier in the season," said Stanton Florea, spokesperson for the United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service. "Looking at the big picture, we're still at the Extreme Fire Danger [level]. The general conditions are still extreme." Multiple signs warned motorists Wednesday morning not to stop while driving on Angeles Crest Highway just north of La Cañada.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe and Jennifer Berry | March 31, 2006
Three members of the Montrose Search and Rescue team found the body  of a person in a single-engine plane that crashed near Switzer's Campground at about 3 p.m. Thursday. Search and Rescue Capt. Janet Henderson said the search for more bodies was called off at about 6 p.m., two and a half hours after the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department Air 5 helicopter lowered the three team members and two paramedics by cable into a steep ravine about four miles into Angeles National Forest.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | October 18, 2007
Angeles National Forest is a beautiful area where families and outdoor enthusiasts hike, picnic and camp. One thousand miles of twisting roads, paved and unpaved, wind through the forest. Those roads not only entice nature lovers, but those who love to speed. On a Saturday ride-along with California Highway Patrol Officer Michael Morrin, the reality of this urban forest became apparent to a reporter the minute the early morning shift began. “We already have a report of an accident,” Morrin said as he began working at 7 a.m. The accident was a single vehicle that had overturned on Angeles Crest Highway.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | July 5, 2012
James Hall has spent nearly 20 years patrolling the Angeles National Forest, doing everything from leading an engine crew to showing inner-city youth the wonders of the outdoors. Now he is playing a leadership role in firefighting and fire prevention in the sprawling wilderness. Last month Hall was named fire chief for the forest, capping a 33-year tour of duty with the U.S. Forest Service. Hall first joined the agency in 1979 after a stint in the Army. He served as a squad leader of a 20-man “hot shot” firefighting crew in Northern California's Lassen National Forest in 1989 before transferring to the Angeles National Forest in 1994.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | January 7, 2011
December showers that prompted fears of debris flow damage in hillside neighborhoods below Station fire burn areas have also significantly lowered the risk of wildfire for the Angeles National Forest. For the first time since last January, U.S. Forest Service officials on Friday downgraded the Angeles National Forest's fire danger level from "high" to the lowest level possible. While staffing and the availability of firefighting resources tend to be factors in setting fire danger levels, the primary reason for the reduced risk level is that forest lands are simply soaked, said Sherry Rollman, the Forest Service's spokesperson on Angeles National Forest matters.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 11, 2012
An ursine troublemaker was tranquilized and taken deep into the Angeles National Forest on Tuesday morning after repeat visits to area homes, but foothills residents shouldn't hold their breath waiting for their next “Yogi Bear” moment. California Fish and Game officials say bear visits are not on the rise in and around La Cañada Flintridge, despite the fact that bears are waking up earlier than usual this year because of the warm winter. “Normally they hibernate and they go down and they lie around all winter,” Fish and Game spokesman Andrew Hughan said.
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