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NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | March 19, 2009
Something wonderful always happens at Adat Ari El Synagogue. Case in point — the collection bins. One month we collected toothpaste for a homeless shelter. The bins overflowed with Colgate, Crest and Tom’s Organic Toothpaste. Then it was diapers. This month, there are racks upon racks of what is beginning to look like a mini dress shop — prom dresses for girls in foster care. And then, there’s the food. Last year, the rabbis suggested a community sponsored agriculture project: Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, refers to local farms from which individuals commit to buy seasonal produce.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | February 1, 2007
The weather may be warming, however the effects of the recent freeze lingers. During a visit last Saturday to the farmers' market in La Cañada shoppers may not have seen extreme effects of the agricultural devastation, but, according to growers, they will. "I have a lot of friends that have been devastated," said Rick Nickolas of Nickolas Farms. Nickolas sat behind his table at the La Cañada farmers' market on Saturday, cutting samples of oranges for his customers. His farm is in Orange Cove in Fresno County.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
Letters to the Editor Most of state’s water for crops Thanks for highlighting the increasingly dire water situation [“The tap’s running dry,” editor’s column, June 19]. Here are some bullet points in answer that I believe to be essential in understanding water usage in California: •Eighty-five percent (85%) of our water goes to agriculture. •Agriculture is given that water at highly subsidized rates and in some cases, considering the cost of delivery, virtually for free.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2006
A tour of historical agricultural sites in the Inland Empire is being offered by Descanso Gardens. The tour will leave Descanso at 8:45 a.m. and return at approximately 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 7. Reservations are required by Sept. 20. The first stop will be at the Graber Olive House in historic Ontario, where participants can see and hear about the 100-year history and process of curing and canning Graber olives. The next stop will be Citrus Historic Park for a catered lunch and program about the history of citrus farming and trees.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | February 3, 2011
In a remote part of the hills above La Cañada Flintridge, a landowner is fighting a lonely battle on whether small-scale commercial farming, practiced here since the late 1800s, still has a place. William Johnson owns 67 acres along Angeles Crest Highway, where city limits abut National Forest land. He is fighting on two fronts for the right to maintain a tiny farming operation that includes a persimmon orchard and horses. Johnson Ranch makes use of an additional 11 acres owned by Southern California Edison, land that Johnson claims the right to use. City officials dispute this, saying it cannot be farmed because it is zoned as open space.
NEWS
August 10, 2010
A section of Flintridge is included in an 89-square-mile quarantine area established Tuesday by the California Department of Food and Agriculture to stop the spread of Oriental fruit flies. The area where the fruit flies have been found is bordered on the west by Figueroa Street, on the south by Interstate 10, on the east by the Big Santa Anita Wash and on the north by an imaginary line in the foothills of Pasadena. In Flintridge the impacted neighborhoods are those east of Chevy Chase Drive and south of Highland Drive.
NEWS
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | April 11, 2012
For La Cañada homeowners used to enjoying backyard-grown oranges and lemons, news of a citrus disease's recent appearance in Hacienda Heights is raising an alarm. The disease, called huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is an incurable bacterial infection that attacks the vascular system of citrus plants, slowly killing them. One infected tree in Hacienda Heights so far is the only documented case of HLB in California. But because its insect carrier, the Asian citrus psyllid, has been in the state since 2008 and Los Angeles since 2009, California Department of Food and Agriculture authorities are being vigilant about its spread.
NEWS
February 7, 2008
Suspect meat off LCUSD menus In response to an investigation announced on Jan. 30 by the United States Department of Agriculture into Westland Meat Company products, the La Cañada Unified School District has purchased meat from another processor. The meat in question was pulled from the school menu when the district received word of the possible contaminated food on Friday, said Mike Leininger, assistant superintendent of facilities and operations. “Everything from [Westland]
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NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe.piasecki@latimes.com | February 3, 2011
In a remote part of the hills above La Cañada Flintridge, a landowner is fighting a lonely battle on whether small-scale commercial farming, practiced here since the late 1800s, still has a place. William Johnson owns 67 acres along Angeles Crest Highway, where city limits abut National Forest land. He is fighting on two fronts for the right to maintain a tiny farming operation that includes a persimmon orchard and horses. Johnson Ranch makes use of an additional 11 acres owned by Southern California Edison, land that Johnson claims the right to use. City officials dispute this, saying it cannot be farmed because it is zoned as open space.
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NEWS
By Anita Susan Brenner | March 19, 2009
Something wonderful always happens at Adat Ari El Synagogue. Case in point — the collection bins. One month we collected toothpaste for a homeless shelter. The bins overflowed with Colgate, Crest and Tom’s Organic Toothpaste. Then it was diapers. This month, there are racks upon racks of what is beginning to look like a mini dress shop — prom dresses for girls in foster care. And then, there’s the food. Last year, the rabbis suggested a community sponsored agriculture project: Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, refers to local farms from which individuals commit to buy seasonal produce.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
Letters to the Editor Most of state’s water for crops Thanks for highlighting the increasingly dire water situation [“The tap’s running dry,” editor’s column, June 19]. Here are some bullet points in answer that I believe to be essential in understanding water usage in California: •Eighty-five percent (85%) of our water goes to agriculture. •Agriculture is given that water at highly subsidized rates and in some cases, considering the cost of delivery, virtually for free.
NEWS
By Mary O'Keefe | February 1, 2007
The weather may be warming, however the effects of the recent freeze lingers. During a visit last Saturday to the farmers' market in La Cañada shoppers may not have seen extreme effects of the agricultural devastation, but, according to growers, they will. "I have a lot of friends that have been devastated," said Rick Nickolas of Nickolas Farms. Nickolas sat behind his table at the La Cañada farmers' market on Saturday, cutting samples of oranges for his customers. His farm is in Orange Cove in Fresno County.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2006
A tour of historical agricultural sites in the Inland Empire is being offered by Descanso Gardens. The tour will leave Descanso at 8:45 a.m. and return at approximately 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 7. Reservations are required by Sept. 20. The first stop will be at the Graber Olive House in historic Ontario, where participants can see and hear about the 100-year history and process of curing and canning Graber olives. The next stop will be Citrus Historic Park for a catered lunch and program about the history of citrus farming and trees.
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