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NEWS
June 26, 2008
Letters to the Editor Most of state’s water for crops Thanks for highlighting the increasingly dire water situation [“The tap’s running dry,” editor’s column, June 19]. Here are some bullet points in answer that I believe to be essential in understanding water usage in California: •Eighty-five percent (85%) of our water goes to agriculture. •Agriculture is given that water at highly subsidized rates and in some cases, considering the cost of delivery, virtually for free.
NEWS
By Elaine La Marr | June 7, 2007
The Foothill Municipal Water District (FMWD) has announced that wholesale water rates charged the local agencies it supplies will increase on average of $57.33 per acre-foot of water beginning in early 2008. Areas serviced by the FMWD pay rates currently of $643-$736 per acre-foot of water. New rates will range from $700 to $794. According to Jay Malinowski, FMWD's interim general manager, the average home consumes one-half acre foot of water annually. Areas serviced by the FMWD include La Cañada Flintridge, Altadena, Montrose, La Crescenta and portions of Glendale.
NEWS
August 12, 2004
Reporter Jake Armstrong did a fine job in boiling down the complex subject of water rates ("Wholesale Water Rate Change to be Considered") in the Sun two weeks ago. In reporting the rate Foothill Municipal Water District (FMWD) pays to Metropolitan Water District (MWD), however, I provided him with the rates for both treated and untreated water. Since FMWD purchases only treated water from MWD, the rate we pay is the $326 reported PLUS a $92 treatment surcharge for a total of $418 an acre-foot.
NEWS
By Jake Armstrong | July 29, 2004
The Foothill Municipal Water District Board of Directors at a meeting next month will consider a change in the way the imported water wholesaler charges local public and private water agencies when those agencies exceed certain usage levels, officials said. La Cañada Flintridge-based FMWD, a Metropolitan Water District member agency, provides imported water to the Crescenta Valley Water District, the La Cañada Irrigation District, Mesa Crest Water Company, Valley Water Company and three other agencies to the east, all which serve some 80,000 people.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | August 25, 2012
Local water officials continue to push clients to use water conservation measures, offering an array of rebates to residents who upgrade fixtures and appliances or replace grassy lawns with less thirsty plants. The Foothill Municipal Water District is offering rebates to homeowners who place barrels under drain spouts to catch rain water for irrigation, install efficient lawn sprinklers and switch to low-flow toilets and washers, as well as to those who get rid of their turf. Nina Jazmadarian, Foothill's general manager, said the turf rebate has proven popular in La Cañada, with the utility using more than $25,000 in rebate set-asides last year and expecting to do the same this year.
NEWS
By Mary O’Keefe | April 30, 2009
The board of directors of the Foothill Municipal Water District voted unanimously Monday to approve a resolution adopting a conservation plan and to move the district to a Stage 4, meaning there will be a reduction in the allocation of imported water. “We will have significant, 10 to 15% [reduction of water] for the agencies; less water this year than the base years 2004, 2005 and 2006,” said Nina Jazmadarian, general manager of the Foothill Municipal Water District.
NEWS
By Jake Armstrong | November 24, 2004
Strong winds disrupted power and darkened areas of La Cañada Flintridge Sunday as a familiar - but unexpected - type of storm dusted local mountains with snow in weather events a climatologist says is making for a "very strange fall." Gusts up to 50 mph knocked a tree branch into power equipment near Briggs Avenue and El Moreno Street in La Crescenta Sunday morning, leaving about 2,000 Southern California Edison customers in La Cañada and La Crescenta in the dark for two hours, SCE spokeswoman Christine McLeod said.
NEWS
By Joe Piasecki, joe-piasecki@latimes.com | March 30, 2011
Home to almost exclusively water-saving native plants, Lisa Novick’s La Cañada Flintridge backyard is alive with the sound of birds and is a kaleidoscope of color. In a city known for expansive and obsessively uniform golf-course green lawns, it’s also an anomaly. You might even call it a protest. Novick, who has installed a rainwater catchment system to reduce her reliance on imported water, believes Foothills residents — who collectively use 1 billion gallons of water or more each year for irrigation purposes alone — would benefit from growing stronger ties to the natural world.
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NEWS
June 26, 2008
Letters to the Editor Most of state’s water for crops Thanks for highlighting the increasingly dire water situation [“The tap’s running dry,” editor’s column, June 19]. Here are some bullet points in answer that I believe to be essential in understanding water usage in California: •Eighty-five percent (85%) of our water goes to agriculture. •Agriculture is given that water at highly subsidized rates and in some cases, considering the cost of delivery, virtually for free.
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